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Real-Time Historical Analysis of Monetary Policy Rules

Author

Listed:
  • Alex Nikolsko-Rzhevskyy

    () (Lehigh University)

  • David Papell

    () (University of Houston)

Abstract

The size of the output gap coefficient is the key determinant of whether quantitative easing since 2009 and continued near-zero interest rates can by justified by a Taylor rule. Fed Chair Ben Bernanke and Vice-Chair Janet Yellen have argued that John Taylor proposed a monetary policy rule with a larger output gap coefficient in his 1999 paper than in his 1993 paper, and have used this argument to justify negative prescribed interest rates in 2009-2010 and near-zero interest rates through 2015. While Taylor neither proposed nor advocated a different rule in 1999 than in 1993, he did not draw a distinction between the implications of the two rules. In accord with common practice at the time, Taylor used revised data. We show that, using real-time data available to policymakers (although not to Taylor when he wrote the paper), there is a sharp difference in the implications of rules with a smaller and a larger output gap coefficient. If John Taylor had been able to use real-time data in his 1999 paper, the importance of the distinction between Taylor’s original rule with a smaller output gap coefficient and other rules with a larger coefficient would have been evident much earlier.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Nikolsko-Rzhevskyy & David Papell, 2013. "Real-Time Historical Analysis of Monetary Policy Rules," Working Papers 2013-140-17, Department of Economics, University of Houston.
  • Handle: RePEc:hou:wpaper:2013-140-17
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    File URL: http://www.uh.edu/econpapers/RePEc/hou/wpaper/2013-140-17.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Orphanides, Athanasios, 2003. "The quest for prosperity without inflation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 633-663, April.
    2. Athanasios Orphanides, 2001. "Monetary Policy Rules Based on Real-Time Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 964-985, September.
    3. Nelson Edward, 2005. "The Great Inflation of the Seventies: What Really Happened?," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-50, July.
    4. Alex Nikolsko-Rzhevskyy & David H. Papell, 2013. "Taylor's Rule Versus Taylor Rules," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(1), pages 71-93, February.
    5. Nikolsko-Rzhevskyy, Alex & Papell, David H., 2012. "Taylor rules and the Great Inflation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 903-918.
    6. Orphanides, Athanasios, 2003. "Historical monetary policy analysis and the Taylor rule," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(5), pages 983-1022, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Paul Krugman Pontificating on Policy Rules
      by John Taylor in Economics One on 2015-02-04 00:43:44
    2. [経済]ポール・クルーグマンが政策ルールについて御託を並べている
      by himaginary in himaginaryの日記 on 2015-03-06 06:00:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen G. Cecchetti & Tommaso Mancini-Griffoli & Machiko Narita & Ratna Sahay, 2020. "US or Domestic Monetary Policy: Which Matters More for Financial Stability?," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 68(1), pages 35-65, March.
    2. Nikolsko-Rzhevskyy, Alex & Papell, David H. & Prodan, Ruxandra, 2014. "Deviations from rules-based policy and their effects," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 4-17.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Real-Time Data; Monetray Policy Rules; Taylor Rule;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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