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The regime-dependent evolution of credibility: A fresh look at Hong Kong’s linked exchange rate system

  • Blagov , Boris

    ()

    (BOFIT)

  • Funke, Michael

    ()

    (BOFIT)

An estimated Markov-switching DSGE modelling framework that allows for parameter shifts across regimes is employed to test the hypothesis of regime-dependent credibility of Hong Kong’s linked exchange rate system. The model distinguishes two regimes with respect to the time-series properties of the risk premium. Regime-dependent impulse responses to macroeconomic shocks reveal substantial differences in spreads. These findings contribute to efforts at modelling exchange rate regime credibility as a non-linear process with two distinct regimes.

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File URL: http://www.suomenpankki.fi/bofit_en/tutkimus/tutkimusjulkaisut/dp/Documents/2013/dp2413.pdf
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Paper provided by Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition in its series BOFIT Discussion Papers with number 24/2013.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: 04 Sep 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:bofitp:2013_024
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