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The loss of interest for the euro in Romania

Listed author(s):
  • Claudiu Albulescu

    ()

    (CRIEF - Centre de Recherche sur l'Intégration Economique et Financière - Université de Poitiers)

  • Dominique Pépin

    (CRIEF - Centre de Recherche sur l'Intégration Economique et Financière - Université de Poitiers)

We generalize a money demand micro-founded model to explain Romanians' recent loss of interest for the euro. We show that the reason behind this loss of interest is a severe decline in the relative degree of the euro liquidity against that of the Romanian leu.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Working Papers with number hal-01361214.

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Date of creation: 06 Sep 2016
Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01361214
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01361214
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  1. Christian Dreger & Hans-Eggert Reimers & Barbara Roffia, 2007. "Long-Run Money Demand in the New EU Member States with Exchange Rate Effects," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(2), pages 75-94, April.
  2. Hansen, Bruce E, 2002. "Tests for Parameter Instability in Regressions with I(1) Processes," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 45-59, January.
  3. Andreea Andronescu & Hassan Mohammadi & James Payne, 2004. "Long-run estimates of money demand in Romania," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(14), pages 861-864.
  4. Melina Dritsaki & Chaido Dritsaki, 2012. "A panel data approach to the demand for money in Bulgaria and Romania," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(8), pages 705-710, May.
  5. Claudiu Tiberiu Albulescu & Dominique Pépin & Stephen Miller, 2016. "The micro-foundations of an open economy money demand: An application to the Central and Eastern European countries," Working Papers hal-01348842, HAL.
  6. Wen-Jen Hsieh & Yu Hsing, 2009. "Tests of currency substitution, capital mobility and nonlinearity of Hungary's money demand function," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(9), pages 959-964.
  7. Bas Van Aarle & Nina Budina, 1996. "Currency substitution and seignorage in eastern europe," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(3), pages 279-298.
  8. Boriss Siliverstovs, 2008. "Dynamic modelling of the demand for money in Latvia," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 8(1), pages 53-74, October.
  9. Lucas, Robert E. & Nicolini, Juan Pablo, 2015. "On the stability of money demand," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 48-65.
  10. Jarko Fidrmuc, 2009. "Money demand and disinflation in selected CEECs during the accession to the EU," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(10), pages 1259-1267.
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