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Social interactions and malaria preventive behaviors in sub-saharan africa

Author

Listed:
  • Bénédicte Apouey

    (PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, PSE - Paris School of Economics - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)

  • Gabriel Picone

    (Department of Economics - USF - University of South Florida [Tampa])

Abstract

This paper examines the existence of social interactions in malaria preventive behaviors in Sub-Saharan Africa, that is, whether an individual's social environment has an influence on the individual's preventive behaviors. We focus on the two population groups which are the most vulnerable to malaria (children under 5 years and pregnant women) and on two preventive behaviors (sleeping under a bednet and taking intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy). We define the social environment of the individual as people living in the same region. To detect social interactions, we calculate the size of the social multiplier by comparing the effects of an exogenous variable at individual and regional levels. Our data come from 92 surveys for 29 Sub-Saharan countries between 1999 and 2012, and they cover approximately 660,000 children and 95,000 women. Our results indicate that there are social interactions in malaria preventive behaviors in the form of social multipliers effects of women's education and household wealth. The long-run effects of these characteristics on preventive behaviors at the regional level are larger than those apparent at the individual level.

Suggested Citation

  • Bénédicte Apouey & Gabriel Picone, 2014. "Social interactions and malaria preventive behaviors in sub-saharan africa," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" halshs-01109038, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:pseose:halshs-01109038
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.3055
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    Cited by:

    1. Natallia Gray & Gabriel Picone, 2018. "Evidence of Large-Scale Social Interactions in Mammography in the United States," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 46(4), pages 441-457, December.
    2. Bénédicte Apouey & Gabriel Picone & Joshua Wilde & Joseph Coleman & Robyn Kibler, 2017. "Paludisme et anémie des enfants en Afrique subsaharienne : effet de la distribution de moustiquaires," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 68(2), pages 163-197.
    3. B�n�dicte H. Apouey & Gabriel Picone & Joshua Wilde & Joseph Coleman & Robyn Kibler, 2016. "Malaria and Anemia among Children in sub-Saharan Africa: the Effect of Mosquito Net Distribution," Working Papers 0116, University of South Florida, Department of Economics.
    4. Guccio, C. & Lisi, D., 2014. "Social interactions in inappropriate behavior for childbirth services: Theory and evidence from the Italian hospital sector," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 14/28, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    5. Islam, Asadul & Ushchev, Philip & Zenou, Yves & Zhang, Xin, 2019. "The Value of Information in Technology Adoption," IZA Discussion Papers 12672, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Rute Martins Caeiro, 2022. "Diffusion of agricultural innovations in Guinea-Bissau: From learning to doing," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2022-7, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Fink, Günther & Masiye, Felix, 2015. "Health and agricultural productivity: Evidence from Zambia," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 151-164.
    8. Guccio, Calogero & Lisi, Domenico, 2016. "Thus do all. Social interactions in inappropriate behavior for childbirth services in a highly decentralized healthcare system," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-17.
    9. Rute Martins Caeiro, 2019. "From Learning to Doing: Diffusion of Agricultural Innovations in Guinea-Bissau," NBER Working Papers 26065, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Zenou, Yves & Islam, Asad & Ushchev, Philip & Zhang, Xin, 2018. "The Value of Information in Technology Adoption: Theory and Evidence from Bangladesh," CEPR Discussion Papers 13419, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    preventive behaviors; social multiplier; malaria; social interactions;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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