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Persistent Differences in Mortality Patterns across Industrialized Countries

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  • Hippolyte d'Albis

    () (PSE - Paris School of Economics, CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Loesse Jacques Esso

    () (ENSEA - Ecole nationale supérieure de statistique et d'économie appliquée [Abidjan])

  • Héctor Pifarré I Arolas

    () (TSE - Toulouse School of Economics - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UT1 - Université Toulouse 1 Capitole)

Abstract

The epidemiological transition has provided the theoretical background for the expectation of convergence in mortality patterns. We formally test and reject the convergence hypothesis for a sample of industrialized countries in the period from 1960 to 2008. After a period of convergence in the decade of 1960 there followed a sustained process of divergence with a pronounced increase at the end of the 1980's, explained by trends within former Socialist countries (Eastern countries). While Eastern countries experienced abrupt divergence after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, differences within Western countries remained broadly constant for the whole period. Western countries transitioned from a strong correlation between life expectancy and variance in 1960 to no association between both moments in 2008 while Eastern countries experienced the opposite evolution. Taken together, our results suggest that convergence can be better understood when accounting for shared structural similarities amongst groups of countries rather than through global convergence.

Suggested Citation

  • Hippolyte d'Albis & Loesse Jacques Esso & Héctor Pifarré I Arolas, 2014. "Persistent Differences in Mortality Patterns across Industrialized Countries," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" hal-01061000, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:pseose:hal-01061000
    DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0106176
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01061000
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker & Tomas J. Philipson & Rodrigo R. Soares, 2005. "The Quantity and Quality of Life and the Evolution of World Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 277-291, March.
    2. Robert J. Barro & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 2003. "Economic Growth, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262025531, September.
    3. Ryan D. Edwards & Shripad Tuljapurkar, 2005. "Inequality in Life Spans and a New Perspective on Mortality Convergence Across Industrialized Countries," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 31(4), pages 645-674, December.
    4. Chris Wilson, 2001. "On the Scale of Global Demographic Convergence 1950–2000," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(1), pages 155-171, March.
    5. France Meslé, 2004. "Mortality in Central and Eastern Europe," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 2(3), pages 45-70.
    6. Duncan Gillespie & Meredith Trotter & Shripad Tuljapurkar, 2014. "Divergence in Age Patterns of Mortality Change Drives International Divergence in Lifespan Inequality," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(3), pages 1003-1017, June.
    7. Jacques Vallin & France Meslé, 2004. "Convergences and divergences in mortality," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 2(2), pages 11-44.
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    Cited by:

    1. Adam Szulc, 2016. "Changing Mortality Distribution In Developed Countries From 1970 To 2010: Looking At Averages And Beyond Them," Statistics in Transition New Series, Polish Statistical Association, vol. 17(3), pages 467-496, September.
    2. d’Albis, Hippolyte & Bonnet, Florian, 2018. "Inequalities in life expectancy and the global welfare convergence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 49-51.
    3. Florian Bonnet, 2019. "Spatial Distribution of Population by Age in France over the Past 150 years," Working Papers hal-02067193, HAL.

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    Keywords

    Industrialized Countries;

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