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Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study

Author

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  • Andrew E. Clark

    (PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, PSE - Paris School of Economics)

  • Tom Lee

    (Institute for Fiscal Studies)

Abstract

We here use data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) to provide one of the first analyses of the distal (early-life) and proximal (later-life) correlates of older-life subjective well-being. Unusually, we have two distinct measures of the latter: happiness and eudaimonia. Even after controlling for proximal covariates, outcomes at age 18 (IQ score, parental income and parental education) remain good predictors of well-being over 50 years later. In terms of the proximal covariates, mental health and social participation are the strongest predictors of both measures of well-being in older age. However, there are notable differences in the other correlates of happiness and eudaimonia. As such, well-being policy will depend to an extent on which measure is preferred
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew E. Clark & Tom Lee, 2018. "Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study," Post-Print halshs-01884166, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-01884166
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01884166
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    as
    1. Carol Graham & Soumya Chattopadhyay, 2013. "Gender and well-being around the world," International Journal of Happiness and Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 1(2), pages 212-232.
    2. James J. Heckman & Stefano Mosso, 2014. "The Economics of Human Development and Social Mobility," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 6(1), pages 689-733, August.
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Early-Life Correlates of Later-Life Well-Being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2018-02-20 19:19:51

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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