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Le retour de l’économie keynésienne

Listed author(s):
  • Xavier Ragot

    (OFCE - OFCE - Sciences Po, PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, PSE - Paris School of Economics)

Les modèles macroéconomiques standards utilisés avant la crise, qualifiés de néokeynésiens, reposent sur la notion de taux d’intérêt naturel plutôt que de demande effective. Or les développements récents de la théorie macroéconomique modélisent de manière bien plus réaliste le fonctionnement du marché des biens et services et le fonctionnement du marché du travail. Ces modèles retrouvent les intuitions keynésiennes – sous-consommation, paradoxe de l’épargne – dans des cadres qui permettent une confrontation plus rigoureuse aux données. Le caractère keynésien ou néoclassique de l’économie ne devrait pas être un enjeu politique ou théorique, mais plutôt un enjeu empirique. À cet égard, des résultats économétriques récents indiquent par exemple que l’économie américaine se comporte de manière keynésienne dans les grandes crises et de manière non keynésienne dans les crises de moindre amplitude, ce qui devrait guider la politique économique.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number halshs-01509704.

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Date of creation: Feb 2016
Publication status: Published in Revue d'économie financière, Association d'économie financière 2016, pp.173-186
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-01509704
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01509704
Contact details of provider: Web page: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Mathilde Le Moigne & Xavier Ragot, 2015. "France et Allemagne : une histoire du désajustement européen," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(6), pages 177-231.
  2. Matthew Canzoneri & Robert Cumby & Behzad Diba & David Lãpez-Salido, 2008. "Monetary Aggregates and Liquidity in a Neo-Wicksellian Framework," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(8), pages 1667-1698, December.
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  7. Simon Dubecq & Benoit Mojon & Xavier Ragot, 2015. "Risk Shifting with Fuzzy Capital Constraints," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 11(1), pages 71-101, January.
  8. Christian Dustmann & Bernd Fitzenberger & Uta Sch?nberg & Alexandra Spitz-Oener, 2014. "From Sick Man of Europe to Economic Superstar: Germany's Resurgent Economy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 28(1), pages 167-188, Winter.
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