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Development At The Border: Policies and National Integration In Côte D'Ivoire and Its Neighbors

Author

Listed:
  • Denis Cogneau

    (PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, PSE - Paris School of Economics, IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement)

  • Sandrine Mesplé-Somps
  • Gilles Spielvogel

Abstract

By applying regression discontinuity designs to a set of household surveys from the 1980-90s, we examine whether Côte d'Ivoire's aggregate wealth was translated at the borders of neighboring countries. At the border of Ghana and at the end of the 1980s, large discontinuities are detected for consumption, child stunting, and access to electricity and safe water. Border discontinuities in consumption can be explained by differences in cash crop policies (cocoa and coffee). When these policies converged in the 1990s, the only differences that persisted were those in rural facilities. In the North, cash crop (cotton) income again made a difference for consumption and nutrition (the case of Mali). On the one hand, large differences in welfare can hold at the borders dividing African countries despite their assumed porosity. On the other hand, border discontinuities seem to reflect the impact of reversible public policies rather than intangible institutional traits.

Suggested Citation

  • Denis Cogneau & Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Gilles Spielvogel, 2013. "Development At The Border: Policies and National Integration In Côte D'Ivoire and Its Neighbors," Post-Print halshs-00941919, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00941919
    DOI: 10.1093/wber/lht033
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00941919
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Elise Huillery, 2009. "History Matters: The Long-Term Impact of Colonial Public Investments in French West Africa," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 176-215, April.
    2. T. Paul Schultz, 1998. "Inequality in the distribution of personal income in the world: How it is changing and why," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 11(3), pages 307-344.
    3. Enrico Spolaore & Romain Wacziarg, 2005. "Borders and Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 331-386, December.
    4. McCrary, Justin, 2008. "Manipulation of the running variable in the regression discontinuity design: A density test," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(2), pages 698-714, February.
    5. Easterly, William & Levine, Ross, 1998. "Troubles with the Neighbours: Africa's Problem, Africa's Opportunity," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 7(1), pages 120-142, March.
    6. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/10262 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Lee, David S., 2008. "Randomized experiments from non-random selection in U.S. House elections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(2), pages 675-697, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Denis Cogneau, 2016. "History, Data and Economics for Africa: Can We Get Them Less Wrong?: Reply to Morten Jerven's ‘Trapped between tragedies and miracles: Misunderstanding African economic growth’," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 34(6), pages 895-899, November.
    2. Denis Cogneau & Kenneth Houngbedji & Sandrine Mesplé-Somps, 2013. "The fall of the elephant. Two decades of poverty increase in Côte d’Ivoire (1988 - 2008)," Post-Print hal-01517394, HAL.
    3. TENIKUE Michel & TEQUAME Miron, 2018. "Economic and Health Impacts of the 2011 Post-Electoral Crisis in Côte d?Ivoire: Evidence from Microdata," LISER Working Paper Series 2018-03, LISER.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Côte d'ivoire;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • P52 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Studies of Particular Economies

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