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What matters in residential energy consumption: evidence from France

Listed author(s):
  • Claire Salmon

    (IREGE - Institut de Recherche en Gestion et en Economie - USMB [Université de Savoie] [Université de Chambéry] - Université Savoie Mont Blanc)

  • Anna Risch

    (GAEL - Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquée de Grenoble - Grenoble INP - Institut polytechnique de Grenoble - Grenoble Institute of Technology - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes)

Given the objectives countries set to realise energy savings and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, an understanding of the main factors driving household energy consumption is crucial in formulating effective policy measures. The objective of this study is to identify the main determinants of household energy consumption in French residences. The model uses a discrete-continuous decision framework that allows for interactions between decisions about the heating system (discrete choice) and about energy consumption (continuous choice). The results show that the intensity of energy used per square metre is almost completely determined by the technical properties of the dwelling and the climate. The role of socio-demographic variables is shown to be particularly small. The paper shows that to be effective, environmental policy must strongly encourage households to renovate and adopt energy-saving appliances.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number hal-01577799.

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Date of creation: 2017
Publication status: Published in International Journal of Global Energy Issues, Inderscience, 2017, 40 (1/2), pp.79 - 116. . <10.1504/IJGEI.2017.10000892>
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01577799
DOI: 10.1504/IJGEI.2017.10000892
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01577799
Contact details of provider: Web page: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/

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