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Who pays for the consumption of young and old ?

Author

Listed:
  • Hippolyte d'Albis

    () (PSE - Paris School of Economics)

  • Carole Bonnet

    (Département des maladies du système nerveux - CHU Pitié-Salpêtrière [APHP])

  • Najat El Mekkaoui
  • Angela Greulich

    () (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Jérôme Hubert

    (LEM - Lille économie management - LEM - UMR 9221 - Université de Lille - UCL - Université catholique de Lille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Julien Navaux

    (uOttawa - University of Ottawa [Ottawa])

Abstract

This article provides a comprehensive overview of how the funding of consumption at different ages is shared between the State, the individual and the family. By applying the National Transfer Accounts method for France, we developed a unique database to analyze how the funding of consumption is secured at each age, how its structure has changed over time, and how the consumption is financed in France compared to that of a set of other developed countries. We find that the elderly in France finance themselves increasingly by their own means, even though public funding of this age group remains significant in France in comparison to other countries. Conversely, the young rely more and more on the State to finance their consumption. Within our sample, France is the country where the young benefited most from public transfers.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Hippolyte d'Albis & Carole Bonnet & Najat El Mekkaoui & Angela Greulich & Jérôme Hubert & Julien Navaux, 2018. "Who pays for the consumption of young and old ?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01916552, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:hal-01916552
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01916552
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    as
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