IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/grz/wpaper/2013-02.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Promoting alternative, environmentally friendly passenger transport technologies: Directed technological change in a bottom-up/top-down CGE model

Author

Listed:
  • Veronika Kulmer

    () (Wegener Center for Climate and Global Change, University of Graz, Austria)

Abstract

This paper evaluates policy options that foster the progress of alternative, environmentally friendly passenger transport technologies in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions viable technological switch. For the example of Austria, we develop a dynamic computable general equilibrium model which explicitly considers passenger transport technologies comprising "internal combustion engine” (ICE), “plug-in hybrid electric vehicle” (PHEV), “electric vehicle” (EV) and “fuel cell electric vehicle” (FCEV). Regarding technological progress we also incorporate labor augmenting, directed technological change. For policy analysis, we study the effects of (i) a phase out of ICE and subsidy in R&D, (ii) a fuel tax and subsidy in R&D and (iii) an output subsidy on FCEV. We find that in terms of overall emission reduction, in the given time scale from 2005 to 2050, the continuous phase-out of ICE in combination with a subsidy in R&D is the most effective policy measure. The fuel tax in combination with a subsidy in R&D shows the smallest emission reduction. However, in terms of costs, impacts on consumption of private goods are the smallest among all policy instruments. Moreover, domestic output of economic sectors is boosted. Finally, results show, that the competitiveness of FCEV implies a considerable fall in emissions and favors production of several economic sectors, such as electrical machinery and chemical products. However, in order to ensure competitiveness the output subsidy on FCEV is extremely high, impacting private consumption strongly.

Suggested Citation

  • Veronika Kulmer, 2013. "Promoting alternative, environmentally friendly passenger transport technologies: Directed technological change in a bottom-up/top-down CGE model," Graz Economics Papers 2013-02, University of Graz, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:grz:wpaper:2013-02
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www100.uni-graz.at/vwlwww/forschung/RePEc/wpaper/2013-02.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daron Acemoglu & Philippe Aghion & Leonardo Bursztyn & David Hemous, 2012. "The Environment and Directed Technical Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 131-166.
    2. Christoph Bohringer and Andreas Loschel, 2006. "Promoting Renewable Energy in Europe: A Hybrid Computable General Equilibrium Approach," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 135-150.
    3. Andreas Fier & Dietmar Harhoff, 2002. "Die Evolution der bundesdeutschen Forschungs- und Technologiepolitik: Rückblick und Bestandsaufnahme," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, pages 279-301.
    4. Loschel, Andreas, 2002. "Technological change in economic models of environmental policy: a survey," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2-3), pages 105-126, December.
    5. Weiss, Martin & Patel, Martin K. & Junginger, Martin & Perujo, Adolfo & Bonnel, Pierre & van Grootveld, Geert, 2012. "On the electrification of road transport - Learning rates and price forecasts for hybrid-electric and battery-electric vehicles," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 374-393.
    6. Frei, Christoph W. & Haldi, Pierre-Andre & Sarlos, Gerard, 2003. "Dynamic formulation of a top-down and bottom-up merging energy policy model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 1017-1031, August.
    7. Sue Wing, Ian, 2006. "Representing induced technological change in models for climate policy analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, pages 539-562.
    8. Sue Wing, Ian, 2008. "The synthesis of bottom-up and top-down approaches to climate policy modeling: Electric power technology detail in a social accounting framework," Energy Economics, Elsevier, pages 547-573.
    9. Alan Manne & Richard Richels, 1992. "Buying Greenhouse Insurance: The Economic Costs of CO2 Emission Limits," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026213280x, January.
    10. Goulder, Lawrence H. & Schneider, Stephen H., 1999. "Induced technological change and the attractiveness of CO2 abatement policies," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3-4), pages 211-253, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kirchner, Mathias & Schmidt, Johannes & Kindermann, Georg & Kulmer, Veronika & Mitter, Hermine & Prettenthaler, Franz & Rüdisser, Johannes & Schauppenlehner, Thomas & Schönhart, Martin & Strauss, Fran, 2015. "Ecosystem services and economic development in Austrian agricultural landscapes — The impact of policy and climate change scenarios on trade-offs and synergies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 161-174.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    technology policy; directed technological change; computable general equilibrium;

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • Q55 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Technological Innovation
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:grz:wpaper:2013-02. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael Scholz). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vgrazat.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.