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Determinants of Subjective Well-Being in Portugal: A Micro-Data Study

Author

Listed:
  • Sara Ramos

    () (Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra, Portugal)

  • Elias Soukiazis

    () (Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra and GEMF, Portugal)

Abstract

The Subjective Well-Being status has gained a growing research attention in social sciences during the last decades. The attention given by the academic world to this issue has been followed by the community in general. This line of research is still undeveloped in Portugal, and therefore needs further investigation. The purpose of this study is to analyze the determinants of Life Satisfaction and Happiness as proxies for Subjective Well-Being of the Portuguese citizens using micro-data from the European Quality of Life Survey. OLS regressions and Ordinal Logistic models are estimated to identify the main factors that explain well-being in Portugal. We find that trust in public institutions, satisfaction with material conditions, volunteering activities and employment status have a positive and significant effect on Life Satisfaction. Our evidence also shows that satisfaction with family, satisfaction with material conditions, participation in sport activities, optimism and the marital status are relevant factors in explaining citizen’s Happiness in Portugal. The results are similar using OLS or Maximum Likelihood estimation techniques on ordinal logistic models.

Suggested Citation

  • Sara Ramos & Elias Soukiazis, 2014. "Determinants of Subjective Well-Being in Portugal: A Micro-Data Study," GEMF Working Papers 2014-16, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
  • Handle: RePEc:gmf:wpaper:2014-16.
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Happiness; Life Satisfaction; Subjective Well-Being; Ordinal Logit Models; Factor Analysis.;

    JEL classification:

    • C1 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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