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The Role and Development of Technology-Intensive Suppliers in Resource-Based Economies: A Literature Review

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  • Carlos Torres Fuchslocher

    () (GIGA Institute of Latin American Studies)

Abstract

Although primary industries are important to developing countries, they have been largely unable to contribute to rapid growth. Systematically strengthening the development of local technology-intensive suppliers (t-suppliers), however, may contribute to both reinforcing the industrial base and supporting the competitiveness of primary production. Indeed, the development of t-suppliers has been common in those resource-based economies which achieved a high level of development (Scandinavia, Canada, Australia). This paper explores the role of t-suppliers in natural resource-based economies. It outlines a theoretical framework for the analysis of the factors which foster or constrain their development and defines areas for an effective promotion of t-suppliers. The proposed model of analysis distinguishes between factors influencing the development of t-suppliers on the level of the main industry (MI), the level of supplier firms or firm-level and the level of external determinants with special reference to industrial policy factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlos Torres Fuchslocher, 2007. "The Role and Development of Technology-Intensive Suppliers in Resource-Based Economies: A Literature Review," GIGA Working Paper Series 60, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:gig:wpaper:60
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William F. Maloney, 2002. "Missed Opportunities: Innovation and Resource-Based Growth in Latin America," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2002), pages 111-168, August.
    2. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew M. Warner, 1995. "Natural Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 5398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    4. Matsuyama, Kiminori, 1992. "Agricultural productivity, comparative advantage, and economic growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 317-334, December.
    5. Auty, Richard M., 1994. "Industrial policy reform in six large newly industrializing countries: The resource curse thesis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 11-26, January.
    6. Sanjaya Lall & Carlo Pietrobelli, 2002. "Failing to Compete," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2360.
    7. Schmitz, Hubert & Nadvi, Khalid, 1999. "Clustering and Industrialization: Introduction," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(9), pages 1503-1514, September.
    8. Manuel Albaladejo, "undated". "Determinants and Policies to Foster the Competitiveness of SME Clusters: Evidence from Latin America," QEH Working Papers qehwps71, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
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    12. Ramos, Joseph, 2001. "Complejos productivos en torno a los recursos naturales: ¿una estrategia prometedora?," Libros de la CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 2282, February.
    13. Cramer, Christopher, 1999. "Can Africa Industrialize by Processing Primary Commodities? The Case of Mozambican Cashew Nuts," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(7), pages 1247-1266, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Technology-intensive suppliers; resource-based economies; developing countries; SME promotion; economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • Q22 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Fishery
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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