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Brazil’s Nuclear Policy. From Technological Dependence to Civil Nuclear Power

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  • Daniel Flemes

    () (GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies)

Abstract

Since March 2006 Brazil has been the ninth country to control the full nuclear fuel cycle. While the U.S. government bashes the uranium enrichment activities in Iran, it has come to an arrangement with the uranium enrichment in its backyard after transitional diplomatic tensions. As signer of the Non-Proliferation Treaty Brazil has the right to enrich uranium for peaceful use. This article focuses on the political motives and objectives connected with the domination of this key technology. Brasilia has been striving for regional leadership and participation in international decision making processes. In historical perspective the Brazilian enrichment procedure marks the liberation from the technological U.S. dependence. Brazil seems to be on the way to establish itself as a civil nuclear power in international relations.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Flemes, 2006. "Brazil’s Nuclear Policy. From Technological Dependence to Civil Nuclear Power," GIGA Working Paper Series 23, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:gig:wpaper:23
    as

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    Keywords

    Brazil; nuclear policy; uranium enrichment; Non-Proliferation Treaty; U.S. foreign policy;

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