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The Politics of Contestation in Asia: How Japan and Pakistan Deal with their Rising Neighbors

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Listed:
  • Hannes Ebert

    () (GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies)

  • Daniel Flemes

    () (GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies)

  • Georg Strüver

    () (GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies)

Abstract

Rising powers have attracted tremendous interest in international politics and theory. Yet the ways in which secondary powers strategically respond to regional changes in the distribution´ of power have been largely neglected. This article seeks to fill this gap by presenting a systematic comparative analysis of the different types of and causes of contestation strategies undertaken by secondary powers. Empirically, it focuses on two contentious regional dyads in East and South Asia, exploring how structural, behavioral, and historical factors shape the way in which Japan and Pakistan respond, respectively, to China’s and India’s regional power politics. The paper concludes that the explanatory power of these factors depends on the particular context: in the case of Japan, China’s militarily assertive regional role has invoked the most significant strategic shifts, while in the case of Pakistani contestation, shifts in polarity have had the largest impact on the strategic approach.

Suggested Citation

  • Hannes Ebert & Daniel Flemes & Georg Strüver, 2012. "The Politics of Contestation in Asia: How Japan and Pakistan Deal with their Rising Neighbors," GIGA Working Paper Series 206, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:gig:wpaper:206
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    File URL: http://www.giga-hamburg.de/dl/download.php?d=/content/publikationen/pdf/wp206_ebert-flemes-struever.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Karadag, Roy, 2010. "Neoliberal restructuring in Turkey: From state to oligarchic capitalism," MPIfG Discussion Paper 10/7, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
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