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Ethnicity and Party Systems in Francophone Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Matthias Basedau

    () (GIGA Institute of African Affairs)

  • Alexander Stroh

    () (GIGA Institute of African Affairs)

Abstract

Despite earlier assumptions that ethnicity is a central feature of African party systems, there is little substantial evidence for this claim. The few studies with an empirical foundation rarely rely on individual data and are biased in favor of Anglophone Africa. This paper looks at four Francophone countries, drawing on four representative survey polls in Benin, Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger. Multivariate regression models and bivariate control tools reveal that ethnicity matters as a determinant of party preference, but that its impact is generally rather weak and differs with regard to party systems and individual parties. “Ethnic parties” in the strict sense are almost completely absent, and only the Beninese party system is substantially “ethnicized.” In particular, regional ties between voters and leaders—rather than ethnic affiliation alone—deserve attention in the future study of voting behavior in Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthias Basedau & Alexander Stroh, 2009. "Ethnicity and Party Systems in Francophone Sub-Saharan Africa," GIGA Working Paper Series 100, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:gig:wpaper:100
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    1. repec:cup:apsrev:v:97:y:2003:i:03:p:379-390_00 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:cup:apsrev:v:66:y:1972:i:01:p:68-90_13 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Keywords

    political parties; ethnic groups; voting intentions; multivariate logistic regression;

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