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Working Paper 06-11 - Homogenising detailed employment data


  • Bart Van den Cruyce


In the national accounts labour inputs are collected by industry. Homogenising means transforming labour inputs by industry into labour inputs by product. This homogenisation is done using mathematical techniques. The paper compares the results for two wellknown techniques (product technology and industry technology) and discusses the effects of homogenisation on Belgian data for the years 2000 and 2005. Labour inputs are detailed by gender and education level. An additional distinction is made between employees and self-employed. The paper proposes a solution for the negatives problem that arises when applying the product technology model in the case of self-employed workers. It also assesses the plausibility of results by showing the effects of homogenising on wage costs and value added per head as well as on the ranking of industries by education level. The product and the industry technology model yield significantly different results, most particularly for the employment use of wholesale and retail trade. The results of the product technology model are judged to be most plausible.

Suggested Citation

  • Bart Van den Cruyce, 2011. "Working Paper 06-11 - Homogenising detailed employment data," Working Papers 1106, Federal Planning Bureau, Belgium.
  • Handle: RePEc:fpb:wpaper:1106

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Anita Wölfl & Isabelle Wanner & Tomasz Koźluk & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 2009. "Ten Years of Product Market Reform in OECD Countries: Insights from a Revised PMR Indicator," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 695, OECD Publishing.
    2. Renaud Bourlès & Gilbert Cette & Jimmy Lopez & Jacques Mairesse & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 2013. "Do Product Market Regulations In Upstream Sectors Curb Productivity Growth? Panel Data Evidence For OECD Countries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(5), pages 1750-1768, December.
    3. Henry van der Wiel & George van Leeuwen, 2003. "Do ICT spillovers matter; evidence from Dutch firm-level data," CPB Discussion Paper 26, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    4. Bruno Van Pottelsberghe De La Potterie, 1997. "Issues in Assessing the Effect of Interindustry R&D Spillovers," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(4), pages 331-356.
    5. Johannes Van Biesebroeck, 2007. "ROBUSTNESS OF PRODUCTIVITY ESTIMATES -super-," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 529-569, September.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity


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