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NILS Working paper no 170. The impact of major--job mismatch on college graduates' early career earnings

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  • Zhu, Rong

Abstract

In this paper, I assess the impact of the mismatch between college major and job on college graduates' early career earnings using a sample from China. I find that on average a major--job mismatched college graduate suffers from a small income loss. I argue that Chinese universities' emphasis on both general skills and major-specific skills could possibly explain why the average income penalty from major--job mismatch is very limited for college graduates in China. I also find that the income loss is heterogeneous and skewed that about one third of the major--job mismatched college graduates earn more than those matched ones.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhu, Rong, 2011. "NILS Working paper no 170. The impact of major--job mismatch on college graduates' early career earnings," NILS Working Papers 26072, National Institute of Labour Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:fli:wpaper:26072
    Note: Zhu, R. 2011. The impact of major--job mismatch on college graduates' early career earnings. Working Paper No 170
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2328/26072
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    Keywords

    University education; Employment; Wages; Income;

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