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Migration in an ageing Europe: What are the challenges?

Author

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  • Jesus Crespo Cuaresma
  • Peter Huber
  • Doris A. Oberdabernig
  • Anna Raggl

Abstract

We use new migration modelling and projection techniques in order to quantify the effect of migration in the context of ageing societies in Europe over the forthcoming decades. Using new empirical results, data and projections of migration flows developed in the framework of the WWWforEUROPE project, we inform the policy discussion concerning the role of demographic change, inequality dynamics, labour market integration of migrants and the sustainability of public finances in the continent.

Suggested Citation

  • Jesus Crespo Cuaresma & Peter Huber & Doris A. Oberdabernig & Anna Raggl, 2015. "Migration in an ageing Europe: What are the challenges?," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 79, WWWforEurope.
  • Handle: RePEc:feu:wfewop:y:2015:m:1:d:0:i:79
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:wfo:wstudy:58791 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:feu:wfedel:y:2016:m:2:d:0:i:12 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Karl Aiginger, 2016. "New Dynamics for Europe: Reaping the Benefits of Socio-ecological Transition. Synthesis Report Part I," WWWforEurope Deliverables series 11, WWWforEurope.
    4. Laura DIACONU (MAXIM), 2015. "The Refugees And The Economic Growth In The Eu States: Challenges And Opportunities," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 7(4), pages 881-890, December.
    5. Marina De Angelis & Marcella Corsi & Daniele Frigeri, 2017. "The determinants of entrepreneurship for migrants in Italy. Do Italian migrants become entrepreneurs by “opportunity” or through “necessity”?," Working Papers CEB 17-031, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Academic research; Challenges for welfare system; Demographic change; Economic growth path; European economic policy; Full employment growth path; Labour markets; Migration; Policy options; Sustainable growth; Welfare state;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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