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Women's Work and Family Profiles over the Lifecourse and their Subsequent Health Outcomes. Evidence for Europe

  • Thomas Leoni
  • Rainer Eppel

The reconciliation of family and work is one of the "new social risks" contemporary welfare states are challenged to address. This paper contributes to a better understanding of the roles of work and family in women's life trajectories, shedding light on determinants and welfare outcomes of different combinations of motherhood and employment. We identify and compare distinctive life-course employment profiles of mothers across 13 European countries. After analyzing selection patterns, we investigate the possible link that exists between these work-family profiles up to the age of 50 and subsequent health outcomes. We embed our empirical investigation in a comparative welfare state framework and differentiate between four geographical areas that can be associated with different types of European welfare state regimes.

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Paper provided by WWWforEurope in its series WWWforEurope Working Papers series with number 28.

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Length: 76
Date of creation: Jul 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:feu:wfewop:y:2013:m:7:d:0:i:28
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Order Information: Postal: WWWforEurope Project Office Austrian Institute of Economic Research Arsenal Objekt 20 A-1030 Vienna
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