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The pricing effects of ambiguous private information

  • Jayant Ganguli


  • Scott Condie

Ambiguous private information leads to informational inefficiency of market prices in rational expectations equilibrium. This inefficiency implies lower asset prices as uninformed traders require a premium to hold assets. This premium is increasing in the riskiness of the asset and leads to excess volatility, price swings, and abrupt volatility and illiquidity variation across informational efficiency regimes. Public information affects the informational efficiency of price and can also lead to abrupt changes involatility and illiquidity.

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Paper provided by University of Essex, Department of Economics in its series Economics Discussion Papers with number 720.

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Date of creation: 30 Oct 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:esx:essedp:720
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  1. Tallon, Jean-Marc, 1998. "Asymmetric Information, Nonadditive Expected Utility, and the Information Revealed by Prices: An Example," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(2), pages 329-42, May.
  2. Judson A. Caskey, 2009. "Information in Equity Markets with Ambiguity-Averse Investors," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(9), pages 3595-3627, September.
  3. Campbell, John Y. & Viceira, Luis M., 2002. "Strategic Asset Allocation: Portfolio Choice for Long-Term Investors," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198296942.
  4. Antonio Mele & Francesco Sangiorgi, 2009. "Ambiguity, Information Acquisition and Price Swings in Asset Markets," FMG Discussion Papers dp633, Financial Markets Group.
  5. David Ahn & Syngjoo Choi & Douglas Gale & Shachar Kariv, 2008. "Estimating Ambiguity Aversion in a Portfolio Choice Experiment," Levine's Working Paper Archive 122247000000001989, David K. Levine.
  6. Scott Condie & Jayant Ganguli, 2011. "Informational efficiency with ambiguous information," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 229-242, October.
  7. Muendler, Marc-Andreas, 2007. "The possibility of informationally efficient markets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 133(1), pages 467-483, March.
  8. Mandler, Michael, 2013. "Endogenous indeterminacy and volatility of asset prices under ambiguity," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 8(3), September.
  9. Thibault Gajdos & Takashi Hayashi & Jean-Marc Tallon & Jean-Christophe Vergnaud, 2006. "Attitude toward imprecise information," Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques v06081, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  10. David A. Chapman & Valery Polkovnichenko, 2009. "First-Order Risk Aversion, Heterogeneity, and Asset Market Outcomes," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 64(4), pages 1863-1887, 08.
  11. Barlevy, Gadi & Veronesi, Pietro, 2003. "Rational panics and stock market crashes," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 110(2), pages 234-263, June.
  12. Marialaura Pesce & Peter Cramton & Nicholas C. Yannelis, 2010. "A new perspective to rational expectations: maximin rational expectations equilibrium," Discussion Papers 1528, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  13. Itay Goldstein & Alexander Guembel, 2008. "Manipulation and the Allocational Role of Prices," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(1), pages 133-164.
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  15. Krebs, Tom, 2007. "Rational expectations equilibrium and the strategic choice of costly information," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(5), pages 532-548, June.
  16. Jayant V Ganguli & Scott Condie, 2008. "Ambiguity and rational expectations equilibria," 2008 Meeting Papers 719, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  17. repec:bla:restud:v:75:y:2008:i:1:p:133-164 is not listed on IDEAS
  18. Han Ozsoylev & Jan Werner, 2011. "Liquidity and asset prices in rational expectations equilibrium with ambiguous information," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 469-491, October.
  19. Masahiro Watanabe, 2008. "Price Volatility and Investor Behavior in an Overlapping Generations Model with Information Asymmetry," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(1), pages 229-272, 02.
  20. Lars Peter Hansen & Thomas J. Sargent, 2007. "Introduction to Robustness," Introductory Chapters, Princeton University Press.
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