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Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 5: results from methodological experiments

Author

Listed:
  • Auspurg, Katrin
  • Burton, Jonathan
  • Cullinane, Carl
  • Delavande, Adeline
  • Laura, Fumagalli
  • Iacovou, Maria
  • Jäckle, Annette
  • Kaminska, Olena
  • Lynn, Peter
  • Mathews, Paul
  • Nicolaas, Gerry
  • Nicoletti, Cheti
  • Ye, Cong
  • Zafar, Basit

Abstract

This paper presents some preliminary findings from Wave 5 of the Innovation Panel (IP5) of Understanding Society: The UK Household Longitudinal Study. Understanding Society is a major panel survey in the UK. In February 2012, the fifth wave of the Innovation Panel went into the field. IP5 used a mixed-mode design, using on-line interviews and face-to-face interviews. This paper describes the design of IP5, the experiments carried and the preliminary findings from early analysis of the data.

Suggested Citation

  • Auspurg, Katrin & Burton, Jonathan & Cullinane, Carl & Delavande, Adeline & Laura, Fumagalli & Iacovou, Maria & Jäckle, Annette & Kaminska, Olena & Lynn, Peter & Mathews, Paul & Nicolaas, Gerry & Nic, 2013. "Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 5: results from methodological experiments," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2013-06, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:ukhlsp:2013-06
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    File URL: https://www.understandingsociety.ac.uk/research/publications/working-paper/understanding-society/2013-06.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Budd, Sarah & Gilbert, Emily & Burton, Jonathan & Jäckle, Annette & Kaminska, Olena & Uhrig, S.C. Noah & Brown, Matthew & Calderwood, Lisa, 2012. "Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 4: results from methodological experiments," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2012-06, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Auspurg, Katrin & Iacovou, Maria & Nicoletti, Cheti, 2014. "Housework Share between Partners: Experimental Evidence on Gender Identity," IZA Discussion Papers 8569, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Allum, Nick & Auspurg, Katrin & Blake, Margaret & Booker, Cara L. & Crossley, Thomas F. & d'Ardenne, Joanna & Fairbrother, Malcolm & Iacovou, Maria & Jäckle, Annette & Kaminska, Olena & Lynn, Peter &, 2014. "Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 6: results from methodological experiments," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2014-04, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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