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Sigma Convergence Versus Beta Convergence: Evidence from County-level Data

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  • Matthew Higgins
  • Daniel Levy
  • Andrew Young

Abstract

This note outlines: 1) Why sigma-convergence may not accompany beta-convergence; 2) Cites evidence of beta-convergence in the U.S.; 3) Demonstrates that sigma-convergence does not hold across the U.S. or within most U.S. states; and 4) Demonstrates the robustness of this finding to increases in mean income. The distributions of shocks appear important towards accounting for income disparity.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew Higgins & Daniel Levy & Andrew Young, 2003. "Sigma Convergence Versus Beta Convergence: Evidence from County-level Data," Emory Economics 0316, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
  • Handle: RePEc:emo:wp2003:0316
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier X., 1996. "Regional cohesion: Evidence and theories of regional growth and convergence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1325-1352, June.
    2. Matthew Higgins & Daniel Levy & Andrew Young, 2003. "Growth and Convergence across the U.S.: Evidence from County-level Data," Emory Economics 0306, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
    3. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    4. Friedman, Milton, 1992. "Do Old Fallacies Ever Die?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 2129-2132, December.
    5. Paul Evans, 1997. "How Fast Do Economies Converge?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(2), pages 219-225, May.
    6. Evans, Paul & Karras, Georgios, 1996. "Do Economies Converge? Evidence from a Panel of U.S. States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(3), pages 384-388, August.
    7. Efthymios Tsionas, 2000. "Regional Growth and Convergence: Evidence from the United States," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(3), pages 231-238.
    8. Nazrul Islam, 1995. "Growth Empirics: A Panel Data Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1127-1170.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jiří Mazurek, 2012. "The Evaluation of an Economic Distance Among Countries: A Novel Approach," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2012(3), pages 277-290.
    2. MIHUT Ioana Sorina & LUTAS Mihaela, 2013. "Teting Sigma Convergence Across New Eu Members," Revista Economica, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 65(4), pages 121-131.

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