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Two essays on development economics

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  • Heymann, Daniel
  • Galiani, Sebastián
  • Dabús, Carlos
  • Tohmé, Fernando

Abstract

We analyze the emergence of large-scale education systems in a framework where growth is associated with changes in the configuration of the economy. We model the incentives that the economic elite could have (collectively); to accept taxation destined to finance the education of credit-constrained workers. Contrary to previous work, in our model, this incentive does not necessarily arise from a complementarity between physical and human capital in manufacturing. Instead, we emphasize the demand for human-capital-intensive services by high-income groups. Our model seems capable to account for salient features of the development of Latin America in the nineteenth century, where, in particular, land-rich countries such as Argentina established an extensive public education system and developed a sophisticated service sector before starting significant manufacturing activities.

Suggested Citation

  • Heymann, Daniel & Galiani, Sebastián & Dabús, Carlos & Tohmé, Fernando, 2006. "Two essays on development economics," Estudios y Perspectivas – Oficina de la CEPAL en Buenos Aires 34, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
  • Handle: RePEc:ecr:col030:4860
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    References listed on IDEAS

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