IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ecb/ecbops/20130148.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The use of credit claims as collateral for Eurosystem credit operations

Author

Listed:
  • Tamura, Kentaro
  • Tabakis, Evangelos

Abstract

Credit claims (or bank loans) represent a large share of the collateral accepted by the Eurosystem in its credit operations in recent years. Hence the techniques and procedures used in the use of credit claims as collateral have become significant elements of the monetary policy implementation mechanism in the euro area. The procedures involved in credit claim collateralisation, however, are generally more complex than those for marketable assets traded in regulated markets or in other markets accepted by the Eurosystem. While several types of credit claims are eligible as Eurosystem collateral, each type of credit claim has different characteristics which require specific considerations in the eligibility assessment. This paper provides an overview of the issues involved in the use of credit claims as collateral and relates these to some measures taken by both the public and the private sector aimed at facilitating their use in the euro area. The paper also elaborates on the syndicated loan market in the euro area as this market is sizeable, while it appears that the use of such loans as collateral remains limited. JEL Classification: G10, G12, G13

Suggested Citation

  • Tamura, Kentaro & Tabakis, Evangelos, 2013. "The use of credit claims as collateral for Eurosystem credit operations," Occasional Paper Series 148, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbops:20130148
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/scpops/ecbocp148.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Sven Steinkamp & Aaron Tornell & Frank Westermann, 2017. "The Euro Area’s Common Pool Problem Revisited: Has the Single Supervisory Mechanism Ameliorated Forbearance and Evergreening?," Working Papers 107, Institute of Empirical Economic Research, Osnabrueck University, revised 06 Oct 2017.
    2. Ahn, Jung-Hyun & Bignon, Vincent & Breton, Régis & Martin, Antoine, 2016. "Interbank market and central bank policy," Staff Reports 763, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    3. Cassola, Nuno & Koulischer, François, 2016. "The collateral channel of open market operations," Working Paper Series 1906, European Central Bank.
    4. C. Cahn & A. Duquerroy & W. Mullins, 2017. "Unconventional Monetary Policy and Bank Lending Relationships," Working papers 659, Banque de France.
    5. Jakob Korbinian Eberl, 2016. "The Collateral Framework of the Eurosystem and Its Fiscal Implications," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 69.
    6. J. Barthélemy & V. Bignon & B. Nguyen, 2018. "Monetary Policy and Collateral Constraints since the European Debt Crisis," Working papers 669, Banque de France.
    7. Wahrenburg, Mark & Kaffenberger, Bijan, 2015. "Fragmentation in the european retail deposit market and implications for loan availability in european member states," SAFE White Paper Series 31, Goethe University Frankfurt, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe.
    8. Bignon, V. & Boissay, F. & Cahn, C. & Harpedanne De Belleville, L-M, 2016. "Les créances privées davantage éligibles au refinancement de l’Eurosystème Conséquences sur l’offre de crédit," Bulletin de la Banque de France, Banque de France, issue 206, pages 19-28.
    9. J-S.Mésonnier & C. O’Donnell & O. Toutain, 2017. "The Interest of Being Eligible," Working papers 636, Banque de France.
    10. Bank for International Settlements, 2015. "Central bank operating frameworks and collateral markets," CGFS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 53.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    central bank collateral eligibility; Credit claim; syndicated loan;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbops:20130148. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Official Publications). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/emieude.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.