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Domestic Financial Development in Emerging Economies: Evidence and Implications

Author

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  • Ettore Dorrucci
  • Alexis Meyer-Cirkel
  • Daniel Santabárbara

Abstract

We construct, on the basis of an original methodology and database, composite indices to measure domestic financial development in 26 emerging economies, using mature economies as a benchmark. Twenty-two variables are used and grouped according to three broad dimensions: (i) institutions and regulations; (ii) size of and access to financial markets and (iii) market performance. This new evidence aims to fill a gap in the economic literature, which has not thus far developed comparable time series including both emerging and mature economies. In doing so, we provide a quantitative measure of the – usually considerable – scope for the selected emerging countries and regions to “catch up” in financial terms. Moreover, we find evidence that a process of financial convergence towards mature economies has already started in certain emerging economies. Finally, we conduct an econometric analysis showing that different levels of domestic financial development tend to be associated with the building up of external imbalances across countries. JEL Classification: F3, F4, G1, G2, E21, E22, C82.

Suggested Citation

  • Ettore Dorrucci & Alexis Meyer-Cirkel & Daniel Santabárbara, 2009. "Domestic Financial Development in Emerging Economies: Evidence and Implications," Occasional Paper Series 102, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbops:20090102
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    File URL: http://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/scpops/ecbocp102.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Marcel Fratzscher, 2014. "Capital Controls and Foreign Exchange Policy," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Miguel Fuentes D. & Claudio E. Raddatz & Carmen M. Reinhart (ed.), Capital Mobility and Monetary Policy, edition 1, volume 18, chapter 7, pages 205-253 Central Bank of Chile.
    2. Philip R. Lane IIIS, Trinity College Dublin and CEPR, 2009. "Innovation and Financial Globalisation," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp299, IIIS.
    3. Hsueh, Shun-Jen & Hu, Yu-Hau & Tu, Chien-Heng, 2013. "Economic growth and financial development in Asian countries: A bootstrap panel Granger causality analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 294-301.
    4. Ila Patnaik & Ajay Shah, 2012. "Asia Confronts the Impossible Trinity," Chapters,in: Monetary and Currency Policy Management in Asia, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Ila Patnaik & Ajay Shah & Rudrani Bhattacharya, 2011. "Monetary Policy Transmission in an Emerging Market Setting," IMF Working Papers 11/5, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Fabio Fornari & Livio Stracca, 2012. "What does a financial shock do? First international evidence," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 27(71), pages 407-445, July.
    7. Rémy Charleroy & Michael A. Stemmer, 2014. "An Emerging Market Financial Conditions Index: A VAR Approach," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01110688, HAL.
    8. Jean-Pierre Allegret & Sana Azzabi, 2012. "Développement financier, croissance de long terme et effets de seuil," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 59(5), pages 553-581, December.
    9. Kar, Muhsin & Nazlıoğlu, Şaban & Ağır, Hüseyin, 2011. "Financial development and economic growth nexus in the MENA countries: Bootstrap panel granger causality analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, pages 685-693.
    10. Clovis Kerdrain & Isabell Koske & Isabelle Wanner, 2011. "Current Account Imbalances: can Structural Reforms Help to Reduce Them?," OECD Journal: Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2011(1), pages 1-44.
    11. Ila Patnaik & Ajay Shah, 2012. "Asia Confronts the Impossible Trinity," Chapters,in: Monetary and Currency Policy Management in Asia, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial development; index construction; commodity and oil-exporting countries; G20; major emerging economies; financial catching up; global imbalances.;

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance
    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets
    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • C82 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Macroeconomic Data; Data Access

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