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The Credit Channel in the Netherlands: Evidence from Bank Balance Sheets

  • L. de Haan

This study contributes to the empirical evidence on the lending channel in the Netherlands using individual bank data. The main conclusion is that a lending channel is operative in the Netherlands. However, it is only operative for unsecured and not for secured lending, possibly because loans with state guarantees get special treatment by banks. Effects of monetary tightening on unsecured lending are more negative for smaller, less liquid and less capitalised banks, in line with the lending channel theory. A contribution of this study is that it gives evidence that the monetary policy impact on bank lending also depends on the market segment in which a bank is active. The evidence suggests that the lending channel is not affecting lending to households as much as it is affecting lending to firms.

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File URL: http://www.dnb.nl/binaries/wo0674_tcm46-145975.pdf
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Paper provided by Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department in its series WO Research Memoranda (discontinued) with number 674.

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Date of creation: 2001
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Handle: RePEc:dnb:wormem:674
Contact details of provider: Postal: Postbus 98, 1000 AB Amsterdam
Web page: http://www.dnb.nl/en/

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  1. Anil K. Kashyap & Jeremy C. Stein, 1997. "The role of banks in monetary policy: a survey with implications for the European Monetary Union," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Sep, pages 2-18.
  2. G.J. De Bondt, 1999. "Banks and monetary transmission in Europe: empirical evidence," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 52(209), pages 149-168.
  3. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 1995. "Inside the Black Box: The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 27-48, Fall.
  4. Anil K Kashyap & Jeremy C. Stein, 1994. "The Impact of Monetary Policy on Bank Balance Sheets," NBER Working Papers 4821, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Sevestre, Patrick & Martinez-Pages, Jorge & Gambacorta, Leonardo & Ehrmann, Michael & Worms, Andreas, 2001. "Financial systems and the role of banks in monetary policy transmission in the euro area," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2001,18, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
  6. G.J. De Bondt, 1999. "Banks and monetary transmission in Europe: empirical evidence," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 52(209), pages 149-168.
  7. Jan Kakes, 2000. "Identifying the mechanism: is there a bank lending channel of monetary transmission in the Netherlands?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(2), pages 63-67.
  8. Jeremy C. Stein & Anil K. Kashyap, 2000. "What Do a Million Observations on Banks Say about the Transmission of Monetary Policy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 407-428, June.
  9. G.J. De Bondt, 1999. "Credit channels in Europe: a cross-country investigation," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 52(210), pages 295-326.
  10. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
  11. Joe Peek & Eric S. Rosengren, 1995. "Is bank lending important for the transmission of monetary policy: an overview," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 39, pages 1-14.
  12. G.J. De Bondt, 1999. "Credit channels in Europe: a cross-country investigation," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 52(210), pages 295-326.
  13. Garretsen, Harry & Swank, Job, 1998. "The Transmission of Interest Rate Changes and the Role of Bank Balance Sheets: A VAR-Analysis for the Netherlands," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 325-339, April.
  14. Paul Louis Ceriel Hilbers, 1998. "Financial Sector Reform and Monetary Policy in the Netherlands," IMF Working Papers 98/19, International Monetary Fund.
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