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Credit Channels and Consumption: European Evidence

  • G.J. de Bondt
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    This paper studies the macroeconomic relevance of credit channels of monetary policy by examining the impact of the external finance premium (EFP), that may vary over the business cycle, on private consumption in Europe. A consumption model incorporates credit channels by assuming that liquidity-constrained consumers not only use current income for financing their consumption, but also external finance, which availability depends on the EFP. The empirical analysis shows an accelerator effect of the EFP on consumption for Germany, Italy and the Netherlands. In contrast, for France, the United Kingdom and Belgium no evidence in favour of this financial propagation mechanism has been found.

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    File URL: http://www.dnb.nl/binaries/sr039_tcm46-146817.pdf
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    Paper provided by Netherlands Central Bank in its series DNB Staff Reports (discontinued) with number 39.

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    Length: 27 pages
    Date of creation: 1999
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:dnb:staffs:39
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Postbus 98, 1000 AB Amsterdam
    Web page: http://www.dnb.nl/en/

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    1. Ramey, Valerie, 1993. "How important is the credit channel in the transmission of monetary policy?," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 1-45, December.
    2. Blundell-Wignall, Adrian & Browne, Frank & Tarditi, Alison, 1995. "Financial Liberalization and the Permanent Income Hypothesis," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 63(2), pages 125-44, June.
    3. Jappelli, Tullio & Pagano, Marco, 1989. "Consumption and Capital Market Imperfections: An International Comparison," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1088-1105, December.
    4. Fase, M. M. G., 1995. "The demand for commercial bank loans and the lending rate," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 99-115, January.
    5. Bacchetta, Philippe & Gerlach, Stefan, 1997. "Consumption and credit constraints: International evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 207-238, October.
    6. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark, 1995. "Inside the Black Box: The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission," Working Papers 95-15, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
    7. Campbell, John Y. & Mankiw, N. Gregory, 1990. "Permanent Income, Current Income, and Consumption," Scholarly Articles 3353762, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    8. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark, 1989. "Agency Costs, Net Worth, and Business Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 14-31, March.
    9. Mankiw, N. Gregory, 1982. "Hall's consumption hypothesis and durable goods," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 417-425.
    10. Anil K. Kashyap & Jeremy C. Stein, 1997. "The role of banks in monetary policy: a survey with implications for the European Monetary Union," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Sep, pages 2-18.
    11. Campbell, John Y. & Mankiw, N. Gregory, 1991. "The response of consumption to income : A cross-country investigation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 723-756, May.
    12. G.J. de Bondt, 1998. "Credit channels in Europe: bank-level panel data analyses," WO Research Memoranda (discontinued) 543, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    13. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    14. Antzoulatos, Angelos A., 1994. "Borrowing constraints, income expectations and the Euler equation : Theory and evidence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 323-327.
    15. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
    16. Antzoulatos, Angelos A., 1997. "On the Excess Sensitivity of Consumption to Information about Income," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 539-553, July.
    17. Antzoulatos, Angelos A., 1996. "Consumer credit and consumption forecasts," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 439-453, December.
    18. Bayoumi, Tamim A, 1993. "Financial Deregulation and Consumption in the United Kingdom," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(3), pages 536-39, August.
    19. Davidson, James E H, et al, 1978. "Econometric Modelling of the Aggregate Time-Series Relationship between Consumers' Expenditure and Income in the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 88(352), pages 661-92, December.
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