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The housing ladder, taxation, and borrowing constraints

  • Job Swank
  • Jan Kakes
  • Alexander F. Tieman

Using a multi-tier model of the housing market, we show that both starters and movers benefit from mortgage interest deduction for higher income groups. However, such tax favouring also tends to facilitate house price explosions, especially when interest rates and downpayment ratios are low. More in general, the efficiency of implicit tax subsidies to homeowners depends critically on the price responsiveness of new construction, which is found to differ strongly from country to country. Irrespective of supply conditions, running down mortgage interest deduction is likely to detract from the profits of lending institutions.

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File URL: http://www.dnb.nl/binaries/ms2002-09_tcm46-147321.pdf
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Paper provided by Netherlands Central Bank, Monetary and Economic Policy Department in its series MEB Series (discontinued) with number 2002-9.

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Date of creation: Jun 2002
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Handle: RePEc:dnb:mebser:2002-9
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Web page: http://www.dnb.nl/en/

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  1. Ortalo-Magne, Francois & Rady, Sven, 1999. "Boom in, bust out: Young households and the housing price cycle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 755-766, April.
  2. DiPasquale Denise & Wheaton William C., 1994. "Housing Market Dynamics and the Future of Housing Prices," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-27, January.
  3. Ortalo-Magné, François & Rady, Sven, 2001. "Housing Market Dynamics: On the Contribution of Income Shocks and Credit Constraints," CEPR Discussion Papers 3015, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Nigel Pain, 1996. "Modelling Structural Change In The UK Housing Market: A Comparison Of Alternative House Price Models," NIESR Discussion Papers 239, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  5. DiPasquale, Denise, 1999. "Why Don't We Know More about Housing Supply?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 9-23, January.
  6. Peter Linneman & Susan Wachter, 1989. "The Impacts of Borrowing Constraints on Homeownership," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 17(4), pages 389-402.
  7. Topel, Robert H & Rosen, Sherwin, 1988. "Housing Investment in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 718-40, August.
  8. Rosen, Harvey S., 1979. "Housing decisions and the U.S. income tax : An econometric analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 1-23, February.
  9. Nakagami, Yasuhiro & Pereira, Alfredo M., 1996. "Budgetary and Efficiency Effects of Housing Taxation in the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 68-86, January.
  10. Dolado, Juan J & Jenkinson, Tim & Sosvilla-Rivero, Simon, 1990. " Cointegration and Unit Roots," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 249-73.
  11. Engle, Robert F, 1982. "Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity with Estimates of the Variance of United Kingdom Inflation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 987-1007, July.
  12. Hakfoort, Jacco & Matysiak, George, 1997. "Housing investment in the Netherlands," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 501-516, October.
  13. Poterba, James M, 1984. "Tax Subsidies to Owner-occupied Housing: An Asset-Market Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 99(4), pages 729-52, November.
  14. William C. LaFayette & Donald R. Haurin & Patric H. Hendershott, 1995. "Endogenous Mortgage Choice, Borrowing Constraints and the Tenure Decision," NBER Working Papers 5074, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. François Ortalo-Magné & Sven Randy, 2001. "Housing market dynamics: on the contribution of income shocks and credit constraints," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 25049, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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