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Central bank balance sheet policies and inflation expectations

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  • Jan Willem van den End
  • Christiaan Pattipeilohy

Abstract

We analyse the empirical effects of credit easing and quantitative easing on inflation expectations and exchange rates. Both monetary policy strategies are summarised in measures for composition and size of the central bank balance sheet and included in a VAR model. The empirical results show that changes in balance sheet size had positive effects on inflation expectations in Japan, while the effects where negligible in the euro area. By contrast, an increasing balance sheet size is associated with reduced short-term inflation expectations in the US and UK, pointing at negative signalling effects. Shocks to balance sheet size or composition have no substantial effects on long-term inflation expectations in the euro area, US and UK. An expanding balance sheet size is associated with an appreciation of the US dollar and a depreciation of the euro, pound sterling and Japanese yen.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Willem van den End & Christiaan Pattipeilohy, 2015. "Central bank balance sheet policies and inflation expectations," DNB Working Papers 473, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:473
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Timothy S. Hills & Taisuke Nakata, 2018. "Fiscal Multipliers at the Zero Lower Bound: The Role of Policy Inertia," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 50(1), pages 155-172, February.
    2. Kerstin Bernoth & Michael Hachula & Michele Piffer & Malte Rieth, 2016. "Effectiveness of the ECB Programme of Asset Purchases: Where Do We Stand? In-Depth Analysis," DIW Berlin: Politikberatung kompakt, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, volume 113, number pbk113.
    3. Malte Rieth & Lisa Gehrt, 2016. "What Causes the Delay in Reforms in Europe?," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 99, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Stephanie Titzck & Jan Willem van den End, 2019. "The impact of size, composition and duration of the central bank balance sheet on inflation expectations and market prices," DNB Working Papers 627, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    5. Burriel, Pablo & Galesi, Alessandro, 2018. "Uncovering the heterogeneous effects of ECB unconventional monetary policies across euro area countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 210-229.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    central banks and their policies; monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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