IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/dnb/dnbwpp/387.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

How bank business models drive interest margins: Evidence from U.S. bank-level data

Author

Listed:
  • Saskia van Ewijk
  • Ivo Arnold

Abstract

The two decades prior to the credit crisis witnessed a strategic shift from a traditional, relationships-oriented model (ROM) to a transactions-oriented model (TOM) of financial intermediation in developed countries. A concurrent trend has been a persistent decline in average bank interest margins. In the literature, these phenomena are often explained using a causality that runs from increased competition in traditional segments to lower margins to new activities. Using a comprehensive dataset with bank-level data on over 16,000 FDIC-insured U.S. commercial banks for a period ranging from 1992 to 2010, this paper qualifies this chain of causality. We find that a bank's business model, measured using a multi-dimensional proxy of relationship banking activity, exerts a robust, positive effect on interest margins. Relationship banks still enjoy considerable interest margins. Our results provide evidence that banks' quest for growth, not the level of competition in traditional retail segments, has transformed banks' balance sheets and has reduced interest rate margins as a by-product.

Suggested Citation

  • Saskia van Ewijk & Ivo Arnold, 2013. "How bank business models drive interest margins: Evidence from U.S. bank-level data," DNB Working Papers 387, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:387
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.dnb.nl/en/binaries/Working%20Paper%20387_tcm47-295326.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Leonardo Gambacorta & Adrian van Rixtel, 2013. "Structural bank regulation initiatives: approaches and implications," BANCARIA, Bancaria Editrice, vol. 6, pages 14-27, June.
    2. Birchwood, Anthony & Brei, Michael & Noel, Dorian M., 2017. "Interest margins and bank regulation in Central America and the Caribbean," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 56-68.
    3. Berger, Allen N. & Goulding, William & Rice, Tara, 2014. "Do small businesses still prefer community banks?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 264-278.
    4. Canan Yildirim & Adnan Kasman, 2015. "Bank Market Power and Non-Interest Income in Emerging Markets," Working Papers 930, Economic Research Forum, revised Jul 2015.
    5. Giuliana Birindelli & Paola Ferretti & Marco Savioli, 2016. "Basel 3: Does One Size Really Fit All Banks' Business Models?," Working Paper series 16-20, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    6. Berger, Allen N. & Goulding, William & Rice, Tara, 2013. "Do Small Businesses Still Prefer Community Banks?," International Finance Discussion Papers 1096, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    7. Giovanni Ferri & Angelo Leogrande, 2015. "Was the Crisis Due to a Shift from Stakeholder to Shareholder Finance? Surveying the Debate," Euricse Working Papers 1576, Euricse (European Research Institute on Cooperative and Social Enterprises).
    8. Westman, Hanna, 2014. "Crisis performance of European banks – does management ownership matter?," Research Discussion Papers 28/2014, Bank of Finland.
    9. repec:eee:spacre:v:20:y:2017:i:1:p:1-12 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    interest margins; relationship banking; transaction banking; bank risk-taking;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:387. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Rob Vet). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dnbgvnl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.