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Trends in Financial Innovation and Their Welfare Impact: An Overview


  • Franklin Allen


There is a fair amount of evidence that financial innovations are sometimes undertaken to create complexity and exploit the purchaser. Thus financial innovation does have a dark side. As far as the financial crisis that started in 2007 is concerned, securitization and subprime mortgages may have exacerbated the problem. However, financial crises have occurred in a very wide range of circumstances, where these and other innovations were not important. There is evidence that in the long run financial liberalization has been more of a problem than financial innovation. There are also many financial innovations that have had a significant positive effect. These include venture capital and leveraged buyout funds to finance businesses. In addition, financial innovation has allowed many improvements in the environment and in global health. On balance it seems likely its effects have been positive rather than negative.

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  • Franklin Allen, 2012. "Trends in Financial Innovation and Their Welfare Impact: An Overview," DNB Working Papers 355, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:355

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Josh Lerner & Morten Sorensen & Per Strömberg, 2011. "Private Equity and Long‐Run Investment: The Case of Innovation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(2), pages 445-477, April.
    2. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
    3. Carmen M. Reinhart & Graciela L. Kaminsky, 1999. "The Twin Crises: The Causes of Banking and Balance-of-Payments Problems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 473-500, June.
    4. Reinhart, Karmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. ""This time is different": panorama of eight centuries of financial crises," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 77-114, March.
    5. Burkhard Drees & Ceyla Pazarbasioglu, 1995. "The Nordic Banking Crises; Pitfalls in Financial Liberalization?," IMF Working Papers 95/61, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Thomas Hellmann & Manju Puri, 2002. "Venture Capital and the Professionalization of Start-Up Firms: Empirical Evidence," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(1), pages 169-197, February.
    7. Baker, George P. & Wruck, Karen H., 1989. "Organizational changes and value creation in leveraged buyouts : The case of the O.M. Scott & Sons Company," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 163-190, December.
    8. Naomi R. Lamoreaux & Margaret Levenstein & Kenneth L. Sokoloff, 2004. "Financing Invention During the Second Industrial Revolution: Cleveland, Ohio, 1870-1920," NBER Working Papers 10923, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Henderson, Brian J. & Pearson, Neil D., 2011. "The dark side of financial innovation: A case study of the pricing of a retail financial product," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(2), pages 227-247, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. W. Scott Frame & Lawrence J. White, 2009. "Technological Change, Financial Innovation, and Diffusion in Banking," Working Papers 09-03, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    2. Lechman, Ewa & Marszk, Adam, 2015. "ICT technologies and financial innovations: The case of exchange traded funds in Brazil, Japan, Mexico, South Korea and the United States," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 355-376.
    3. Ivan Diaz-Rainey & John Ashton & Maz Yap & Murat Genc & Rosalind Whiting, 2015. "The determinants of regulatory responses to risks from financial innovation: Survey evidence from G20," Working Papers 15001, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).
    4. Sanatkhani, Mahboobeh & Vasaf, Esmaeil, 2014. "Dynamics of innovation and efficiency in banking system: An application of SFA and meta-frontier method," MPRA Paper 64840, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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