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Corporate culture and behaviour: A survey

  • Jakob de Haan
  • David-Jan Jansen

Drawing on the literature on organizational psychology, this paper discusses the potential of studying corporate culture and organizational behaviour for financial supervision. First, we discuss how corporate culture is often linked to long-term firm performance. From that perspective, factoring in corporate culture seems worthwhile. Second, the literature on organizational psychology suggests many pitfalls regarding leadership and group decision-making, which would be relevant to monitor. The realization that these mechanisms may materialize seems an important starting point for supervision. Finally, behaviour is often driven by deeper norms and values. To understand these mechanisms, interviews and survey questionnaires would be useful instruments

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File URL: http://www.dnb.nl/en/binaries/Working%20Paper%20334_tcm47-265304.pdf
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Paper provided by Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department in its series DNB Working Papers with number 334.

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Date of creation: Dec 2011
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Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:334
Contact details of provider: Postal: Postbus 98, 1000 AB Amsterdam
Web page: http://www.dnb.nl/en/

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  1. Mayer, David M. & Kuenzi, Maribeth & Greenbaum, Rebecca & Bardes, Mary & Salvador, Rommel (Bombie), 2009. "How low does ethical leadership flow? Test of a trickle-down model," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 1-13, January.
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  16. Henry Chappell & Rob McGregor & Todd Vermilyea, 2007. "The persuasive power of a Committee Chairman: Arthur Burns and the FOMC," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 132(1), pages 103-112, July.
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