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Household savings behaviour in crisis times

Author

Listed:
  • Carin van der Cruijsen
  • Jakob de Haan
  • David-Jan Jansen
  • Robert Mosch

Abstract

We analyze whether households' savings behaviour was affected by adverse experiences during the crisis and knowledge about banking supervision. Using a survey among Dutch households, we find that both factors have affected the allocation of savings. Individuals whose bank went bankrupt or received government support during the crisis gather more information about banks and saving instruments and are more likely to have savings at several banks. Respondents with better knowledge about banking supervision are more likely to gather information about banks and saving instruments, to spread their savings across banks, and to shift savings to other banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Carin van der Cruijsen & Jakob de Haan & David-Jan Jansen & Robert Mosch, 2011. "Household savings behaviour in crisis times," DNB Working Papers 315, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:315
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    File URL: https://www.dnb.nl/en/binaries/wp315_tcm47-257193.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. van der Cruijsen, Carin & de Haan, Jakob & Jansen, David-Jan & Mosch, Robert, 2013. "Knowledge and opinions about banking supervision: Evidence from a survey of Dutch households," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 219-229.
    2. Agarwal, Sumit & Chomsisengphet, Souphala & Liu, Chunlin & Souleles, Nicholas S., 2005. "Do consumers choose the right credit contracts?," CFS Working Paper Series 2005/32, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    3. Sumit Agarwal & John C Driscoll & Xavier Gabaix & David Laibson, 2008. "Learning in the Credit Card Market," Levine's Working Paper Archive 122247000000002028, David K. Levine.
    4. van Rooij, Maarten & Lusardi, Annamaria & Alessie, Rob, 2011. "Financial literacy and stock market participation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(2), pages 449-472, August.
    5. Lusardi, Annamaria & Mitchell, Olivia S., 2007. "Baby Boomer retirement security: The roles of planning, financial literacy, and housing wealth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 205-224, January.
    6. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2017. "How Ordinary Consumers Make Complex Economic Decisions: Financial Literacy and Retirement Readiness," Quarterly Journal of Finance (QJF), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 7(03), pages 1-31, September.
    7. Henrik Cronqvist & Stephan Siegel, 2015. "The Origins of Savings Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 123(1), pages 123-169.
    8. van Rooij, Maarten C.J. & Lusardi, Annamaria & Alessie, Rob J.M., 2011. "Financial literacy and retirement planning in the Netherlands," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 593-608, August.
    9. Dick, Astrid A., 2008. "Demand estimation and consumer welfare in the banking industry," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1661-1676, August.
    10. Nicole Jonker, 2007. "Payment Instruments as Perceived by Consumers – Results from a Household Survey," De Economist, Springer, vol. 155(3), pages 271-303, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Disney, Richard & Gathergood, John, 2013. "Financial literacy and consumer credit portfolios," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(7), pages 2246-2254.
    2. Martin Brown & Stefan Trautmann & Razvan Vlahu, 2012. "Contagious Bank Runs: Experimental Evidence," DNB Working Papers 363, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    3. Federica Teppa & Corrie Vis, 2012. "The CentERpanel and the DNB Household Survey: Methodological Aspects," DNB Occasional Studies 1004, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    savings; financial literacy; financial crisis; household decision-making;

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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