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Stock Market Expectations of Dutch Households

  • Michael Hurd
  • Maarten van Rooij
  • Joachim Winter

Despite its importance for the analysis of life-cycle behavior and, in particular, retirement planning, stock ownership by private households is poorly understood. Among other approaches to investigate these puzzles, recent research has started to elicit private households' expectations of stock market returns. This paper reports findings from a study that collected data over a two-year period both on households' stock market expectations (subjective probabilities of gains or losses) and on whether they own stocks. We document substantial heterogeneity in financial market expectations. Expectations are correlated with stock ownership. Over the two years of our data, stock market prices increased, and expectations of future stock market price changes also increased, lending support to the view that expectations are influenced by recent stock gains or losses.��Â

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File URL: http://www.dnb.nl/binaries/228%20Stock%20Market%20Expectations%20of%20Dutch%20Households_tcm46-225544.pdf
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Paper provided by Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department in its series DNB Working Papers with number 228.

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Date of creation: Nov 2009
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Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:228
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Web page: http://www.dnb.nl/en/

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