IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/dnb/dnbwpp/209.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Human Capital and Employment Growth in German Metropolitan Areas: New Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Steven Poelhekke

Abstract

German metropolitan areas with more highly skilled workers became increasingly skilled between 1975 and 2003, and this has important implications for urban employment growth.Using for the first time German metropolitan areas instead of administrative regions we show that the share of college graduates affects growth by the same magnitude as it does in US MSAs. However, conventional estimators are biased upwards. Correcting for the endogeneity of initial employment and solving a common problem of under-identification shows that the effect is at least a third smaller and closer to 0.5% employment growth for a 10% increase in the concentration of skilled workers. The effect is robust to various controls across two data sets. We additionally question the view that aggregate productivity growth is solely due to college graduates. After distinguishing between six different skill levels we find positive growth effects of high school graduates with vocational training, especially if the local concentration of technical professionals is high. The concentration of non-technical university graduates becomes more important over time, but has less bearing on the marginal growth effects of other skill groups. City success may thus depend on the 'right' combination of skills as well as college graduates.Â

Suggested Citation

  • Steven Poelhekke, 2009. "Human Capital and Employment Growth in German Metropolitan Areas: New Evidence," DNB Working Papers 209, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:209
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.dnb.nl/binaries/wp209_tcm46-216157.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Raimund Krumm & Harald Strotmann, 2010. "The Impact of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions on Job Creation and Destruction," IAW Discussion Papers 61, Institut für Angewandte Wirtschaftsforschung (IAW).
    2. Valerien O. Pede & Raymond J.G.M. Florax & Henri L.F. de Groot, 2011. "Technological Leadership and Sectoral Employment Growth:A Spatial Econometric Analysis for U.S. Counties," Working Papers 11-1, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    3. Ishwarya Balasubramanian, 2016. "Local skill concentrations and district employment growth: a simultaneous equation approach for India," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 56(2), pages 491-511, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    human capital; skills; city employment growth; Germany; GMM estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • R0 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General
    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:209. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Rob Vet). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dnbgvnl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.