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Macro-effects of higher capital and liquidity requirements for banks


  • Robert-Paul Berben
  • Beata Bierut
  • Jan Willem van den End
  • Jan Kakes


The crisis has demonstrated that the ability of banks to absorb shocks needs to be strengthened. The financial tensions that have emerged repeatedly since 2007 could assume such serious proportions because the exposure of the banks was too high and too risky in relation to their capital reserves. As a result, they had too little capacity to absorb the losses on the market positions they had taken and on the loans they had granted. Banks were forced to respond by reducing their highrisk positions. The liquidity buffers held by banks were also generally inadequate, making them vulnerable when market liquidity dried up. Against this backdrop, investors lost confidence at the height of the crisis in the autumn of 2008, and governments had to step in by recapitalising some banks and guaranteeing bank debts. Central banks made liquidity more readily available because the banks were unable to raise funding in the markets, including the interbank market.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert-Paul Berben & Beata Bierut & Jan Willem van den End & Jan Kakes, 2010. "Macro-effects of higher capital and liquidity requirements for banks," DNB Occasional Studies 803, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbocs:803

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Morgan, Peter J. & Pontines, Victor, 2013. "An Asian Perspective on Global Financial Reforms," ADBI Working Papers 433, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    2. de Haan, Leo & van den End, Jan Willem, 2013. "Bank liquidity, the maturity ladder, and regulation," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 3930-3950.
    3. Kooths, Stefan & Plödt, Martin & van Roye, Björn & Scheide, Joachim, 2014. "Makroprudenzielle Finanzmarktpolitik: Nationale Handlungsoptionen im Euroraum," Kiel Discussion Papers 541/542, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    4. Boysen-Hogrefe, Jens & Gern, Klaus-Jürgen & Groll, Dominik & Jannsen, Nils & Kooths, Stefan & Plödt, Martin & Schwarzmüller, Tim & van Roye, Björn & Scheide, Joachim, 2014. "Finanz- und Wirtschaftspolitik bei einer anhaltenden monetären Expansion," Kieler Beiträge zur Wirtschaftspolitik 5, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Gerbert Hebbink & Mark Kruidhof & Jan Willem Slingenberg, 2014. "Bank lending and capital," DNB Occasional Studies 1203, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.

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