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Confidence and trust: empirical investigations for the Netherlands and the financial sector


  • Robert Mosch
  • Henriëtte Prast


This paper studies confidence and trust in the Netherlands, especially with regard to the financial sector. Confidence and trust are qualitative, emotion-based variables which seems to be a powerful force in the economy. The aim of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the relationship between confidence and trust, how confidence and trust influence the way people behave and how this affects the economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Mosch & Henriëtte Prast, 2008. "Confidence and trust: empirical investigations for the Netherlands and the financial sector," DNB Occasional Studies 602, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbocs:602

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John F. Helliwell, 1996. "Economic Growth and Social Capital in Asia," NBER Working Papers 5470, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Edwin Leuven & Hessel Oosterbeek & Bas van der Klaauw, 2010. "The Effect of Financial Rewards on Students' Achievement: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(6), pages 1243-1265, December.
    3. van Rooij, Maarten C.J. & Kool, Clemens J.M. & Prast, Henriette M., 2007. "Risk-return preferences in the pension domain: Are people able to choose?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(3-4), pages 701-722, April.
    4. Céline Christensen & Peter Els & Maarten Rooij, 2006. "Dutch Households’ Perceptions of Economic Growth and Inflation," De Economist, Springer, vol. 154(2), pages 277-294, June.
    5. repec:hrv:faseco:30726298 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Kapteyn, A. & Teppa, F., 2002. "Subjective Measures of Risk Aversion and Portfolio Choice," Discussion Paper 2002-11, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    7. Jansen, W. Jos & Nahuis, Niek J., 2003. "The stock market and consumer confidence: European evidence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 89-98, April.
    8. repec:hrv:faseco:30747159 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Frey, Bruno S & Jegen, Reto, 2001. " Motivation Crowding Theory," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(5), pages 589-611, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hayo, Bernd & Neuenkirch, Edith, 2014. "The German public and its trust in the ECB: The role of knowledge and information search," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 286-303.
    2. van der Cruijsen, Carin & de Haan, Jakob & Jansen, David-Jan & Mosch, Robert, 2013. "Knowledge and opinions about banking supervision: Evidence from a survey of Dutch households," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 219-229.
    3. Ehrmann, Michael & Soudan, Michel & Stracca, Livio, 2012. "Explaining EU Citizens' Trust in the ECB in Normal and Crisis Times," Economics Series 289, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    4. Taškar Sabina & Šebjan Urban, 2015. "Is Trust in Banks in Slovenia Put to the Test?," Naše gospodarstvo/Our economy, De Gruyter Open, vol. 61(3), pages 41-50, June.
    5. Markus Knell & Helmut Stix, 2009. "Trust in Banks? Evidence from normal times and from times of crises," Working Papers 158, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
    6. C. E. Jager, 2017. "A Question of Trust: the Pursuit of Consumer Trust in the Financial Sector by Means of EU Legislation," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 25-49, March.
    7. Butzbach, Olivier, 2014. "Trust in banks: a tentative conceptual framework," MPRA Paper 53587, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    financial supervision; consumer confidence; trust;

    JEL classification:

    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification


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