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Towards a European payments market: survey results on cross-border payment behaviour of Dutch consumers

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  • Nicole Jonker
  • Anneke Kosse

Abstract

National noncash retail payment markets in the euro area will gradually migrate to a single euro payments area (SEPA) from 2008 onwards. Within SEPA, citizens will be able to make and receive payments to and from other euro countries as easily and safely, and on the same conditions, as in their own country using one bank account and one set of payment instruments (debit card, credit transfer and direct debit). This study reveals that the Dutch pay differently for their cross-border purchases than for their domestic purchases and that payment behaviour differs per euro country. The limited cross-border acceptance of the debit card hampers its cross-border usage and encourages the usage of cash and credit cards. Furthermore the Dutch most often use electronic transfers, followed by the credit card, for remote cross-border payments. The speed at which the Dutch will switch over to European debit cards and credit transfers will depend heavily on acceptance levels, prices and safety. Migration to the European direct debit may be hardest to archieve. Here, safety is of vital importance.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicole Jonker & Anneke Kosse, 2008. "Towards a European payments market: survey results on cross-border payment behaviour of Dutch consumers," DNB Occasional Studies 601, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbocs:601
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    File URL: https://www.dnb.nl/binaries/OS_Vol6_1_08_tcm46-175278.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bolt, Wilko & Jonker, Nicole & van Renselaar, Corry, 2010. "Incentives at the counter: An empirical analysis of surcharging card payments and payment behaviour in the Netherlands," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 1738-1744, August.
    2. Wilko Bolt, 2006. "Retail Payments in the Netherlands: Facts and Theory," De Economist, Springer, vol. 154(3), pages 345-372, September.
    3. Baxter, William F, 1983. "Bank Interchange of Transactional Paper: Legal and Economic Perspectives," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(3), pages 541-588, October.
    4. Humphrey, David B & Pulley, Lawrence B & Vesala, Jukka M, 1996. "Cash, Paper, and Electronic Payments: A Cross-Country Analysis," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 28(4), pages 914-939, November.
    5. David B. Humphrey & Lawrence B. Pulley & Jukka M. Vesala, 1996. "Cash, paper, and electronic payments: a cross-country analysis," Proceedings, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), pages 914-941.
    6. William J. Baumol, 1952. "The Transactions Demand for Cash: An Inventory Theoretic Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(4), pages 545-556.
    7. Hans Brits & Carlo Winder, 2005. "Payments are no free lunch," DNB Occasional Studies 302, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    8. Nicole Jonker, 2007. "Payment Instruments as Perceived by Consumers – Results from a Household Survey," De Economist, Springer, vol. 155(3), pages 271-303, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nicole Jonker & Mirjam Plooij & Johan Verburg, 2015. "Does a public campaign influence debit card usage? Evidence from the Netherlands," DNB Working Papers 470, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    2. Martikainen, Emmi & Schmiedel, Heiko & Takalo, Tuomas, 2015. "Convergence of European retail payments," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 81-91.

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