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Financial imbalances and macroprudential policy in a currency union

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Abstract

Despite the efforts that commercials banks have made to promote the use of debit cards and the introduction of new payment methods, the migration from cash to electronic payment methods is not proceeding as quickly as sometimes expected. Why do people pay by cash on one occasion and by bank card on another? How conscious is people's decision making? How rational are there reasons for choosing one method over another? For policy makers at a central bank it is relevant to have insight into the psychological aspects and effects of payment method choice, because it provides a pointer to the roles that payment methods will play in the future. Also these insights are helpful if an authority wants to encourage the usage of a specific means of payment.

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  • Aerdt Houben & Jan Kakes, 2013. "Financial imbalances and macroprudential policy in a currency union," DNB Occasional Studies 1105, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbocs:1105
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    File URL: https://www.dnb.nl/en/binaries/os5_tcm47-298432.pdf
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    1. Boris Hofmann & Bilyana Bogdanova, 2012. "Taylor rules and monetary policy: a global "Great Deviation"?," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, September.
    2. Ordóñez, Javier & Jusélius, Katarina, 2009. "Balassa-Samuelson and Wage, Price and Unemployment Dynamics in the Spanish Transition to EMU Membership," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 3, pages 1-30.
    3. Agur, Itai & Demertzis, Maria, 2013. "“Leaning against the wind” and the timing of monetary policy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 179-194.
    4. Gabriele Galati & Richhild Moessner, 2013. "Macroprudential Policy – A Literature Review," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(5), pages 846-878, December.
    5. Ravn Søren Hove, 2012. "Has the Fed Reacted Asymmetrically to Stock Prices?," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-36, June.
    6. Dirk Schoenmaker, 2013. "An Integrated Financial Framework for the Banking Union: Don’t Forget Macro-Prudential Supervision," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 495, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
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    Cited by:

    1. László Seregdi & János Szakács & Ágnes Tõrös, 2015. "Micro- and macroprudential regulatory instruments compared across the European Union," Financial and Economic Review, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary), vol. 14(4), pages 57-86.
    2. Frank A.G. den Butter & Mathieu L.L. Segers, 2014. "Prospects for an EMU between Federalism and Nationalism," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 14-008/VI, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. repec:eee:jimfin:v:77:y:2017:i:c:p:77-98 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. van Riet, Ad, 2015. "Market-preserving fiscal federalism in the European Monetary Union," MPRA Paper 77772, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Jose L. Diaz-Sanchez & Aristomene Varoudakis, 2016. "Tracking the causes of eurozone external imbalances: new evidence and some policy implications," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 641-668, October.

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