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Education et marchés du travail à Brazzaville et Pointe Noire (Congo-Brazzaville)

  • Kuépié, Mathias
  • Nordman, Christophe Jalil

(english) The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of education on labor market entry, particularly on earnings in the two largest cities of the Republic of Congo. We examine firsthand data from the 2009 Congo's Employment and Informal Sector Survey (Enquête sur l’emploi et le secteur informel au Congo - EESIC) from a representative sample of about 3000 households in the cities of Brazzaville and Pointe-Noire. Results indicate that education is relatively widespread in both cities, with an average of about ten years of schooling. This phenomenon goes back a relatively long time, since even for the over 50 generations, more than eight out of ten adults completed primary school. The labor market itself is characterized by a large informal sector (where more than six out of ten working age people have an activity), which could potentially become a poverty trap and reflects high unemployment (especially among the youth), increasing with the level of education on the market. The Congolese urban labor market is also specifically characterized by the weight of the public sector, where almost one out of three people employed in the capital (Brazzaville) and a little over one out of five for both cities are employed. Therefore, the formal private sector is reduced to its congruent proportion. Multivariate analyses of the risk of unemployment and sectoral choice confirm that young people suffer greatly from lack of professional insertion: for most of these youth, their only choice is to remain unemployed or join the informal sector. To measure the specific impact of education on entry into various segments of the labor market, particularly on activity generated earnings, we directly address issues related to sample selection (related to the endogenous distribution among sectors) and the endogeneity of the education variable in the earnings function. Another important methodological challenge relates to the definition of the functional shape of the link that exists betwe

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Paper provided by Paris Dauphine University in its series Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine with number 123456789/7386.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Publication status: Published in Document de travail DIAL, 2011
Handle: RePEc:dau:papers:123456789/7386
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