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Emissions Trading: What Makes It Work?

  • Chevallier, Julien

The purpose of this paper is to critically discuss the main advantages of introducing environmental regulation tools such as tradable permits markets. Current climate policies, the negotiations under way at the international level, and past experiences with emissions trading in the USA and Europe are critically reviewed. The creation of emissions trading schemes such as the European Union emissions trading scheme plays a key role in the preservation of the global public good that constitutes the climate. This paper calls for the wider development of emissions trading schemes in climate change policy, given a careful design and regulatory appraisal from past experiences. This paper reveals that the introduction of a tradable permits market (such as in Europe on 1 January 2005) which provides incentives to take early abatement measures, may be seen as a decisive first step to fight climate change.

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Paper provided by Paris Dauphine University in its series Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine with number 123456789/4616.

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Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, 2009, Vol. 1, no. 4. pp. 400-406.Length: 6 pages
Handle: RePEc:dau:papers:123456789/4616
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.dauphine.fr/en/welcome.html

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  1. Dinan, Terry & Rogers, Diane Lim, 2002. "Distributional Effects of Carbon AllowanceTrading: How Government Decisions Determine Winners and Losers," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 55(N. 2), pages 199-221, June.
  2. Ekins, Paul & Barker, Terry, 2001. " Carbon Taxes and Carbon Emissions Trading," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 325-76, July.
  3. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521023894 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Jouvet, Pierre-Andre & Michel, Philippe & Rotillon, Gilles, 2005. "Optimal growth with pollution: how to use pollution permits?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 29(9), pages 1597-1609, September.
  5. A. Denny Ellerman & Ian Sue Wing, 2003. "Absolute versus intensity-based emission caps," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(sup2), pages S7-S20, December.
  6. Kling, Catherine & Rubin, Jonathan, 1997. "Bankable permits for the control of environmental pollution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 101-115, April.
  7. Mustafa Babiker, John Reilly and Laurent Viguier, 2004. "Is International Emissions Trading Always Beneficial?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 33-56.
  8. Rubin, Jonathan D., 1996. "A Model of Intertemporal Emission Trading, Banking, and Borrowing," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 269-286, November.
  9. Jacoby, Henry D. & Ellerman, A. Denny, 2004. "The safety valve and climate policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 481-491, March.
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