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The shape of the relationship between mortality and income in France

  • Jusot, Florence

Using a case-control study constructed with two fiscal databases, this paper investigates the shape of the relationship between income and the probability of death in France. The results show that the risk of mortality is strongly correlated with the level of income, independent from the occupational status. This relationship holds across the whole range of income distribution. Specifically the protective effect of highest incomes casts some doubt on the hypothesis of the concavity of the income-health relationship.

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Paper provided by Paris Dauphine University in its series Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine with number 123456789/425.

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Date of creation: Jul 2006
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, 2006, no. 83-84. pp. 89-122.Length: 33 pages
Handle: RePEc:dau:papers:123456789/425
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  8. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
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  10. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
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  12. Harriet Orcutt Duleep, 1986. "Measuring the Effect of Income on Adult Mortality Using Longitudinal Administrative Record Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(2), pages 238-251.
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  14. Annie Mesrine, 2000. "La surmortalité des chômeurs : un effet catalyseur du chômage ?," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 334(1), pages 33-48.
  15. Sermet, Catherine & Rochereau, Thierry & Khlat, Myriam & Jusot, Florence, 2006. "Une mauvaise santé augmente fortement les risques de perte d’emploi," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/475, Paris Dauphine University.
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