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A microeconometric analysis of household savings determinants in Morocco

  • El Mekkaoui de Freitas, Najat
  • Mage-Bertomeu, Sabine
  • Arestoff, Florence
  • Abdelkhalek, Touhami

This article provides an analysis of the microeconomic determinants of household savings behaviour in Morocco according to geographical household residence. Descriptive statistics seem to indicate a similar savings pattern in both rural and urban areas but the econometric results do not support this conclusion. Current income strongly affects the savings level in the urban area whereas the literacy of the household’s head is determinant in the rural one. However, the results do not confirm the life cycle hypothesis. The household’s size has a significant negative impact only in the urban case, while women heads of household save more than men, except for highest income levels. The results clearly show that urban and rural households behave differently with regards to savings.

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File URL: http://basepub.dauphine.fr/xmlui/bitstream/123456789/12164/1/SAVINGS%20SUPPL.%202010_7-27.pdf
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Paper provided by Paris Dauphine University in its series Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine with number 123456789/12164.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Publication status: Published in African Review of Money Finance and Banking, 2010. pp. 7-27.Length: 20 pages
Handle: RePEc:dau:papers:123456789/12164
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  1. Kivilcim Metin Ozcan & Asli Gunay & Seda Ertac, 2003. "Determinants of private savings behaviour in Turkey," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(12), pages 1405-1416.
  2. Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Luis Servén, 1997. "Does Income Inequality Raise Aggregate Saving?," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 08, Central Bank of Chile.
  3. Edwards, Sebastian, 1996. "Why are Latin America's savings rates so low? An international comparative analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 5-44, October.
  4. Khaled Hussein & A. P. Thirlwall, 1999. "Explaining differences in the domestic savings ratio across countries: A panel data study," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 31-52.
  5. Denizer, Cevdet & Wolf, Holger & Ying, Yvonne, 2002. "Household Savings in the Transition," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 463-475, September.
  6. Suruga, Terukazu & Tachibanaki, Toshiaki, 1991. "The Effect of Household Characteristics on Saving Behaviour and the Theory of Savings in Japan," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 351-62.
  7. Norman Loayza & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Luis Servén, 1999. "What Drives Private Saving Across the World?," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 47, Central Bank of Chile.
  8. John K Gibson & Grant M Scobie, 2001. "Household Saving Behaviour in New Zealand: A Cohort Analysis," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/18, New Zealand Treasury.
  9. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Karim El Aynaoui, 2005. "Politiques du marché du travail et chômage au Maroc : une analyse quantitative," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 19(1), pages 5-51.
  10. James Ang, 2009. "Household Saving Behaviour in an Extended Life Cycle Model: A Comparative Study of China and India," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(8), pages 1344-1359.
  11. Carpenter, Seth B & Jensen, Robert T, 2002. "Household Participation in Formal and Informal Savings Mechanisms: Evidence from Pakistan," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(3), pages 314-28, October.
  12. repec:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-3125518 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Amimo, Oliveira & Larson, Donald W. & Bittencourt, Maurício Vaz Lobo & Graham, Douglas H., 2003. "The Potential For Financial Savings In Rural Mozambican Households," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25921, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  14. Mark C. Foley & William Pyle, 2005. "Household Savings in Russia during the Transition," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0522, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
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