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Killing me softly: work and mortality among French seniors

  • Garrouste, Clémentine
  • Blake, Hélène
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    This paper investigates the impact of the retirement age and working life on mortality over 65years old. In 1993, the French government gradually increased incentives to work for seniors. This exogenous shock on labor supply is an instrument for retirement choices of French pensioners. Weuse this exogenous shock to measure how work impacts male mortality. We work on the Echantillon Interrégime des Retraités, an administrative panel data set which provides information on past contribution to the pension system and mortality at two points of time. We find that delaying theretirement age by one year increases the chances of dying within four years by 1.5 percentage pointswhich is equivalent to a decrease of life expectancy at age 64 by 1.68 months. However, this effect isfar from homogeneous if we split our sample by income groups.

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    File URL: http://basepub.dauphine.fr/xmlui/bitstream/123456789/12125/1/206-1767-1-PB.pdf
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    Paper provided by Paris Dauphine University in its series Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine with number 123456789/12125.

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    Date of creation: Jun 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:dau:papers:123456789/12125
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    1. Bonsang Eric & Adam Stéphane & Perelman Sergio, 2010. "Does Retirement Affect Cognitive Functioning?," Research Memorandum 005, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    2. Coe, N.B. & Lindeboom, M., 2008. "Does Retirement Kill You? Evidence from Early Retirement Windows," Discussion Paper 2008-93, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    3. Susann Rohwedder & Robert J. Willis, 2010. "Mental Retirement," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 119-38, Winter.
    4. Coe, Norma B. & Zamarro, Gema, 2011. "Retirement effects on health in Europe," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 77-86, January.
    5. Antoine Bommier & Thierry Magnac & Benoît Rapoport & Muriel Roger, 2005. "Droits à la retraite et mortalité différentielle," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 168(2), pages 1-16.
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