IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Subsidising Stan - Measuring the social benefits of cultural spending


  • Jeff Dayton-Johnson


  • Emily King

    (Department of Economics, Dalhousie University)


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeff Dayton-Johnson & Emily King, 2003. "Subsidising Stan - Measuring the social benefits of cultural spending," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive wpstan, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:dal:wparch:wpstan

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Aubert, Cècile & Bardhan, Pranab & Dayton-Johnson, Jeff, 2003. "Artfilms, Handicrafts and Other Cultural Goods: The Case for Subsidy," Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt62n4f3bh, Department of Economics, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    2. Burt, Oscar R & Brewer, Durward, 1971. "Estimation of Net Social Benefits from Outdoor Recreation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 39(5), pages 813-827, September.
    3. Martin L. Weitzman, 1992. "On Diversity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 363-405.
    4. Kathleen Day & Rose Annue Devlin, 1998. "The Payoff to Work without Pay: Volunteer Work as an Investment in Human Capital," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(5), pages 1179-1191, November.
    5. Brown, Gardner M, Jr & Mendelsohn, Robert, 1984. "The Hedonic Travel Cost Method," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(3), pages 427-433, August.
    6. Paul R. Portney, 1994. "The Contingent Valuation Debate: Why Economists Should Care," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 3-17, Fall.
    7. White, T Anderson & Runge, C Ford, 1994. "Common Property and Collective Action: Lessons from Cooperative Watershed Management in Haiti," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(1), pages 1-41, October.
    8. Heilbrun,James & Gray,Charles M., 2001. "The Economics of Art and Culture," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521637121, March.
    9. Bruce A Seaman, 2011. "Economic Impact of the Arts," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Cultural Economics, Second Edition, chapter 28 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. W. Michael Hanemann, 1994. "Valuing the Environment through Contingent Valuation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 19-43, Fall.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dal:wparch:wpstan. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.