IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/dal/wparch/rderevision9.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

How Should We Measure Poverty in a Changing World? Methodological Issues and Chinese Case Study

Author

Listed:
  • Lars Osberg
  • Kuan Xu

    () (Department of Economics, Dalhousie University)

Abstract

This study asks whether, in a rapidly changing world, the estimated proportion of the world's population with income below US$1 (adjusted according to purchasing power parity) per day is still a good measure of trends in poverty. It argues that strong economic growth in nations such as China implies that the commonly accepted international poverty line definition of one half median national equivalent income is increasingly relevant and that poverty intensity (the normalized deficit or Foster-Greer-Thorbecke (FGT) index of order one) is a better summary index. This index has a convenient graphical representation-the "poverty box". Using the proposed poverty line and the example of ranking the level of rural poverty in Chinese provinces, the study demonstrates how poverty intensity replicates the poverty rankings of the Sen family of poverty indices and captures most of the information content of higher-order FGT indices. Copyright © 2008 The Authors.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Lars Osberg & Kuan Xu, 2007. "How Should We Measure Poverty in a Changing World? Methodological Issues and Chinese Case Study," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive rderevision9, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:dal:wparch:rderevision9
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.economics.dal.ca/RePEc/dal/wparch/RDErevision9.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Meng, Xin & Gregory, Robert & Wang, Youjuan, 2005. "Poverty, inequality, and growth in urban China, 1986-2000," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 710-729, December.
    2. Schady, Norbert R, 2002. "Picking the Poor: Indicators for Geographic Targeting in Peru," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(3), pages 417-433, September.
    3. Lipton, Michael & Ravallion, Martin, 1995. "Poverty and policy," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 41, pages 2551-2657 Elsevier.
    4. Kuan Xu, 1999. "Statistical Inference for the Sen-Shorrocks-Thon Index of Poverty Intensity," Journal of Income Distribution, Journal of Income Distribution, vol. 8(1), pages 8-8, June.
    5. Michael F. Förster & Marco Mira d'Ercole, 2005. "Income Distribution and Poverty in OECD Countries in the Second Half of the 1990s," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 22, OECD Publishing.
    6. John L. Rodgers & Joan R. Rodgers, 1991. "Measuring the Intensity of Poverty among Subpopulations: Applications to the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 338-361.
    7. Sen, Amartya K, 1976. "Poverty: An Ordinal Approach to Measurement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 44(2), pages 219-231, March.
    8. Paolo Figini, 1998. "Inequality Measures, Equivalence Scales and Adjustment for Household Size and Composition," Economics Technical Papers 988, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    9. Myles, John & Picot, Garnett, 2000. "Poverty Indices and Policy Analysis," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(2), pages 161-179, June.
    10. Lars Osberg & Kuan Xu, 1999. "Poverty Intensity: How Well Do Canadian Provinces Compare?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 25(2), pages 179-195, June.
    11. François Bourguignon & Satya Chakravarty, 2003. "The Measurement of Multidimensional Poverty," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 1(1), pages 25-49, April.
    12. Subramanian, S., 2005. "Poverty Measurement and Theories of Beneficence," WIDER Working Paper Series 062, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    13. Thon, Dominique, 1979. "On Measuring Poverty," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 25(4), pages 429-439, December.
    14. Kuan Xu & Lars Osberg, 2002. "On Sen's Approach to Poverty Measures and Recent Developments," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive sensw, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
    15. Jenkins, Stephen P & Lambert, Peter J, 1997. "Three 'I's of Poverty Curves, with an Analysis of UK Poverty Trends," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(3), pages 317-327, July.
    16. Shorrocks, Anthony F, 1995. "Revisiting the Sen Poverty Index," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 63(5), pages 1225-1230, September.
    17. Lars Osberg, 2000. "Poverty in Canada and the United States: measurement, trends, and implications," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 33(4), pages 847-877, November.
    18. Hill, Robert J, 2000. " Constructing Bounds on Per Capita Income Differentials across Countries," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 102(2), pages 285-302, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Duangkamon Chotikapanich & William Griffiths & Wasana Karunarathne & D.S. Prasada Rao, 2013. "Calculating Poverty Measures from the Generalised Beta Income Distribution," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89, pages 48-66, June.
    2. Martin Ravallion & Shaohua Chen, 2011. "Weakly Relative Poverty," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 1251-1261, November.
    3. Achyut Wagle, 2008. "Human Capital Flight: The Cause of Underdevelopment," NRB Economic Review, Nepal Rastra Bank, Research Department, vol. 20, pages 32-43, April.
    4. Matshe, Innocent & Moyo-Maposa, Sibonginkosi & Zikhali, Precious, 2013. "Water Poverty and Rural Development: Evidence from South Africa," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(2), August.
    5. Lars Osberg & Jiaping Shao & Kuan Xu, 2009. "The growth of poor children in China 1991–2000: why food subsidies may matter," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(S1), pages 89-108, April.
    6. Lars Osberg, 2015. "The Hunger of Old Women in Rural Tanzania: Can Subjective Data Improve Poverty Measurement?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(4), pages 723-738, December.
    7. Mussa, Richard, 2015. "A joint analysis of correlates of poverty intensity, incidence, and gap with application to Malawi," MPRA Paper 65205, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Lars Osberg, 2010. "Measuring Economic Insecurity and Vulerability as Part of Economic Well-Being: Concepts and Context," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive osberg_measuring_economic, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    development; poverty; measurement; China; growth;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dal:wparch:rderevision9. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dedalca.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.