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Inter-Regional Migration and Inter-Industry Labour Mobility in Canada: A Simultaneous Approach


  • Osberg, L.
  • Gordon, D.
  • Lin, Z.


This paper argues that interindustry labor mobility and interregional migration are simultaneously determined processes. It estimates a bivariate probit model of migration and mobility and concludes that the interindustry mobility of labor is dominated by the availability of employment hours and that wage differentials are a statistically significant, but small, determinant of interregional migration. The receipt of transfer payments is not associated with lower mobility. Since interindustry mobility is much larger in magnitude than interregional migration, quantity constraints in labor markets are of central importance to the adaptive capacity of the economy.
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Suggested Citation

  • Osberg, L. & Gordon, D. & Lin, Z., 1992. "Inter-Regional Migration and Inter-Industry Labour Mobility in Canada: A Simultaneous Approach," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 92-08, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:dal:wparch:92-08

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Tommasi, Mariano, 1994. "The Consequences of Price Instability on Search Markets: Toward Understanding the Effects of Inflation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1385-1396, December.
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    4. Krane, Spencer D & Braun, Stephen N, 1991. "Production Smoothing Evidence from Physical-Product Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 558-581, June.
    5. Peter A. Diamond, 1993. "Search, Sticky Prices, and Inflation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 53-68.
    6. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1973. "Some International Evidence on Output-Inflation Tradeoffs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(3), pages 326-334, June.
    7. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1972. "Expectations and the neutrality of money," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 103-124, April.
    8. Parsley, David C, 1996. "Inflation and Relative Price Variability in the Short and Long Run: New Evidence from the United States," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 28(3), pages 323-341, August.
    9. Melvin, James R, 1995. "History and Measurement in the Service Sector: A Review," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 41(4), pages 481-494, December.
    10. Taylor, John B, 1975. "Monetary Policy during a Transition to Rational Expectations," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(5), pages 1009-1021, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Calver & Roland Tusz & Erika Rodrigues, 2015. "Interprovincial Migration in Canada: Implications for Output and Productivity Growth, 1987-2014," CSLS Research Reports 2015-19, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    2. David Amirault & Daniel de Munnik & Sarah Miller, 2016. "What drags and drives mobility? Explaining Canada's aggregate migration patterns," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 49(3), pages 1035-1056, August.
    3. Lin, Zhengxi, 1998. "Canadiens nes a l'etranger et Canadiens de naissance : une comparaison de la mobilite interprovinciale de leur main-d'oeuvre," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 1998114f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
    4. Osberg, L., 1995. "The Equity/Efficiency Trade-Off in Retrospect," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 95-04, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
    5. Finnie, Ross, 2001. "The Effects of Inter-provincial Mobility on Individuals' Earnings: Panel Model Estimates for Canada," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2001163e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    6. Michael Benarroch & Hugh Grant, 2004. "The interprovincial migration of Canadian physicians: does income matter?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(20), pages 2335-2345.
    7. Lars Osberg, 1996. "Economic Policy Variables and Population Health," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive healthy, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
    8. Lall, Somik V. & Selod, Harris & Shalizi, Zmarak, 2006. "Rural-urban migration in developing countries : a survey of theoretical predictions and empirical findings," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3915, The World Bank.
    9. Tseng, Jauling, 1996. "Farmer-borrowers' selection of short- and intermediate-term loan contracts: traditional lenders versus nontraditional lenders," ISU General Staff Papers 1996010108000012129, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    10. Luis Ricardo Fuenmayor Vergara, 2013. "Apego familiar y mercado laboral en Colombia: Un análisis de las migraciones recientes," REVISTA DE ECONOMÍA DEL CARIBE 014753, UNIVERSIDAD DEL NORTE.
    11. Basher, Syed A. & Fachin, Stefano, 2008. "The long-term decline of internal migration in Canada – Ontario as a case study," MPRA Paper 6685, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Wang, Qiuyan & Findeis, Jill L., 2004. "Do Women Earn Less In Rural Areas? An Empirical Analysis Of The Female Rural-Urban Wage Differential," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19982, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    13. Bordt, Michael & Das, Sudip & Heisz, Andrew & Larochelle-Cote, Sebastien, 2005. "Labour Markets, Business Activity and Population Growth and Mobility in Canadian CMAs," Trends and Conditions in Census Metropolitan Areas 2005006e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    14. Kathleen M. Day & Stanley L. Winer, 2011. "What do we Know about the Relationship between Regionalized Aspects of the Unemployment Insurance System and Internal Migration in Canada?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3479, CESifo Group Munich.
    15. Shelley Phipps, "undated". "Economics and Well-Being of Canadian Children," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 35, McMaster University.
    16. Ross Finnie, 2004. "Who moves? A logit model analysis of inter-provincial migration in Canada," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(16), pages 1759-1779.

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    labour mobility ; labour market;


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