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Information Technology Externalities: Empirical Evidence from 42 U.S. Industries


  • Mun, S-B.
  • Nadiri, M.I.


Using interindustry transaction in input-output tables, we examine Information Technology (IT) externalities in U.S. private industries over the period 1984-2000. Our empirical results show that computerization of an industry's customer and supplier industries reduces both labor and material costs of the industry. Moreover, cost savings driven by supplier industries are larger than those driven by customer industries. We also find that industries in the services sector enjoy more benefits from IT spillovers than industries in other sectors because of their high IT capital intensity and composition of interindustry transaction. Decomposition of total factor productivity (TFP) suggests that IT externalities can explain considerable parts of TFP growth, although possible mismeasurement of output in services industries leads to exacerbated technical changes of services industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Mun, S-B. & Nadiri, M.I., 2002. "Information Technology Externalities: Empirical Evidence from 42 U.S. Industries," Working Papers 02-03, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  • Handle: RePEc:cvs:starer:02-03

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mirko Draca & Raffaella Sadun & John Van Reenen, 2006. "Productivity and ICT: A Review of the Evidence," CEP Discussion Papers dp0749, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Giuseppe Medda & Claudio Piga, 2014. "Technological spillovers and productivity in Italian manufacturing firms," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 419-434, June.
    3. Maggi, Bernardo & Padoan, Pier Carlo & Guerrieri, Paolo, 2009. "A continuous time model of European growth, integration and technology diffusion: The role of distance," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 631-640, May.
    4. Liu, Ting-Kun & Chen, Jong-Rong & Huang, Cliff C.J. & Yang, Chih-Hai, 2013. "E-commerce, R&D, and productivity: Firm-level evidence from Taiwan," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 272-283.
    5. BEN YOUSSEF, Adel & M'HENNI, Hatem, 2003. "Les effets des technologies de l'information et de communication sur la croissance économique; le cas de la Tunisie
      [ICT contribution to growth; the case of tunisia]
      ," MPRA Paper 27537, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Elena Ketteni & Theofanis Mamuneas & Panos Pashardes, 2013. "ICT and Energy Use: Patterns of Substitutability and Complementarity in Production," Cyprus Economic Policy Review, University of Cyprus, Economics Research Centre, vol. 7(1), pages 63-86, June.
    7. Nordås, Hildegunn Kyvik, 2004. "Vertical specialization and the quality of infrastructure," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2003-04, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    8. Bernardo Maggi, 2014. "ICT Stochastic Externalities and Growth: Missed Opportunities, Beyond Sustainability or What?," DSS Empirical Economics and Econometrics Working Papers Series 2014/4, Centre for Empirical Economics and Econometrics, Department of Statistics, "Sapienza" University of Rome.
    9. Brainerd, Elizabeth & Menon, Nidhiya, 2014. "Seasonal effects of water quality: The hidden costs of the Green Revolution to infant and child health in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 49-64.
    10. Gunnar Eliasson, 2011. "Advanced purchasing, spillovers and innovative discovery," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 121-139, February.
    11. Miyagawa, Tsutomu & Ito, Yukiko & Harada, Nobuyuki, 2004. "The IT revolution and productivity growth in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 362-389, September.
    12. Catherine L. Mann, 2012. "Information Technology Intensity, Diffusion, and Job Creation," Working Papers 46, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
    13. M'HENNI, Hatem, 2004. "La fracture numérique Nord-Sud de la méditerranée; une explication néo-institutionnelle
      [A digital divide between north and south of Mediterranean sea: A neo-institutional explanation]
      ," MPRA Paper 27548, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. M. Ishaq NADIRI & Banani NANDI, 2015. "Modern Communication Technology and its Economic Impact: A Survey of Research Findings," Communications & Strategies, IDATE, Com&Strat dept., vol. 1(100), pages 125-144, 4th quart.
    15. Ana Rincon & Michela VECCHI & Francesco VENTURINI, 2012. "ICT spillovers, absorptive capacity and productivity performance," Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia, Finanza e Statistica 103/2012, Università di Perugia, Dipartimento Economia.

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    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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