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‘Brain drain’ without migration: capital market integration and capital-skill complementarities

  • BEHRENS, Kristian
  • SATO, Yasuhiro

We analyze the impacts of capital market integration on the skill composition of labor, using a framework in which heterogeneous agents decide to invest in the acquisition of skills and where production exhibits increasing returns in the available skill range (i.e., capital-skill complementarity).

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Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) in its series CORE Discussion Papers RP with number -1910.

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Handle: RePEc:cor:louvrp:-1910
Note: In : Economics Bulletin, 18(1), 1-9, 2006
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  1. Sato, Yasuhiro & Thisse, Jacques-Francois, 2007. "Competing for capital when labor is heterogeneous," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(8), pages 2054-2079, November.
  2. Rikard Forslid & Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, 2003. "An analytically solvable core-periphery model," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(3), pages 229-240, July.
  3. Wilson, John Douglas & Wildasin, David E., 2004. "Capital tax competition: bane or boon," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(6), pages 1065-1091, June.
  4. Wilson, John Douglas, 1999. "Theories of Tax Competition," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 52(n. 2), pages 269-304, June.
  5. Docquier, Frédéric & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "Skilled Migration: The Perspective of Developing Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 2873, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Baldwin, Richard & Krugman, Paul, 2000. "Agglomeration, Integration and Tax Harmonization," CEPR Discussion Papers 2630, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Robert J. Barro & Jong-Wha Lee, 2000. "International Data on Educational Attainment: Updates and Implications," CID Working Papers 42, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
  8. Ethier, Wilfred J, 1982. "National and International Returns to Scale in the Modern Theory of International Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 389-405, June.
  9. Zodrow, George R, 2003. "Tax Competition and Tax Coordination in the European Union," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 10(6), pages 651-71, November.
  10. Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & van Ypersele, Tanguy, 2005. "Market size and tax competition," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 25-46, September.
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